Manny Mora....!

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Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 1279

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Published Date : 2018-07-09T18:09:36.000Z

Manny Mora dominó las 2 manga
    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 2142

Likes : 31

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Published Date : 2018-06-04T12:24:23.000Z

Piña darnell lantigua vs manny mora la Vega 2018 video 4k
    

Channel Title : Que Vez?

Views : 553

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Published Date : 2018-05-19T20:02:00.000Z

    

Channel Title : cesar lopez

Views : 4149

Likes : 81

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Published Date : 2017-11-01T00:20:58.000Z

    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 328

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Published Date : 2018-05-14T20:57:25.000Z

Salida Manny Mora
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 10553

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Published Date : 2013-10-31T05:06:57.000Z

One of the most highly regarded American Doo Wop groups from the mid 1950s. Their records are highly sought by hardcore oldies collectors. The group featured here are best remembered for their 1955 east coast hit "Lily Maebelle". Although they never had a record on the national hit parades, they were extremely popular in New York and the East Coast in general and had many regional big sellers. The stage performances of the group were sellouts and their harmonizing and choreography in sequence were amongst the most accomplished of their time. Influenced both musically and in their showmanship by The Cadillacs, The Solitaires, and The Flamingos, The Valentines were able to contribute an innovative stage presentation, outstanding vocals, and some unique performances. The Valentines served as a launching pad for important careers. Their brilliant choreography made them one of the most cherished groups on the East Coast. The group first formed in 1952 in the Sugar Hill district of Harlem as a quartet, harmonizing on the corner of 151st Street and Amsterdam Avenue. The original group comprised Raymond "Pop" Briggs (first tenor), Carl Hogan (second tenor), Mickey Francis (baritone), and Ronnie Bright (bass) calling themselves The Mistletoes; sometime afterwards they changed their names to The Dreamers.
    

Channel Title : Mx Dominicano

Views : 3714

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Published Date : 2017-04-03T15:25:03.000Z

#mxdominicano @mxdominicano en instagram y en en Facebook Mx Dominicano síguenos en nuestras redes y no olvides suscribirte...
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 15235

Likes : 184

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Published Date : 2014-07-03T04:26:58.000Z

The Collegians were an American 1950s doo-wop group from New York City. They recorded for the Harlem-based record producer, Paul Winley. The Collegians biggest hit, "Zoom Zoom Zoom," was released in 1958. Other Collegians' charted hits include "Right Around The Corner," "The One You Love," "Hold Back the Night," and "Let's Go For a Ride." The Marcels later used the intro to "Zoom Zoom Zoom" as the intro to their 1961 smash hit, "Blue Moon."
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5230

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Published Date : 2014-07-09T09:38:41.000Z

Not only was Steubenville, OH, Dean Martin's stomping grounds, the city situated on the Ohio River also spawned the Stereos, a quintet consisting of Bruce Robinson (lead), Nathaniel Hicks (first tenor), Ronnie Collins (bass), Sam Profit (second tenor), and George Otis (baritone). The group's roots began in the mid-'50s when Robinson and Collins formed the Buckeyes (Ohio's nickname) who released two singles on Cincinnati's Deluxe Records in 1957: "Since I Fell for You" b/w "Be Only You" and "Dottie Baby" b/w "Begging You, Please."The Stereos first recorded in 1959 with Leroy Swearingen (first tenor and ex-Buckeye) joining Robinson, Collins, Profit, and Otis for their Gibraltar debut, "A Love for Only You" b/w "Sweetpea's in Love." Its failure caused Swearingen to leave and be replaced by Hicks. The revised lineup had three singles on Cub Records from 1961-1962, with ex-member Swearingen penning their most successful record "I Really Love You" (15 R&B/29 pop); two follow-ups floundered. Two 1962 Robins Nest's singles: "My Heart" and "Don't Cry Darling" also didn't do diddly. A World Artists' single "Mumbling Word" surfaced in 1963, trailed by "Life" as the Sterios (sic) on Ideal Records (1964) and "Don't Let It Happen to You" in 1965 for Val 2 Records. Good records, but the Stereos were a transition group with ingrained doo-wop roots and never fully forsake the sound for full-blown '60s harmonies, but Robinson's gospel-inspired leads made them interesting.They resurfaced on Hyde Records in 1967 as a self-contained outfit adding Stanley Brown, Solomon Huffman, Don Walters, and Ronnie Parris. Profit and Otis left. The revamped Stereos made enough noise with "Stereo Freeze Parts 1 & 2" that Cadet Records plucked it for mass distribution; but "I Can't Stop These Tears" b/w "I Feel Soul A'Coming" pulled up lame in 1968; a third Cadet single, "Your Memory," never got started, forcing permanent disbandment and the end of the Stereo's chase for that elusive royalty check.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 467533

Likes : 3963

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Published Date : 2013-11-15T09:23:52.000Z

The Marcels were an American doo-wop group known for turning popular music songs into rock and roll. The group formed in 1959 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and signed to Colpix Records, with lead Cornelius Harp, bass Fred Johnson, Gene Bricker, Ron Mundy, and Richard Knauss. The group was named after a popular hair style of the day, the marcel wave, by Fred Johnson's younger sister Priscilla. In 1961 many were surprised to hear a new version of the ballad "Blue Moon", that began with the bass singer saying, "bomp-baba-bomp" and "dip-da-dip." The record sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. It is featured in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. The disc went to number one in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and UK Singles Chart.[5] In the U.S., additional revivals in the same vein as "Blue Moon" -- "Heartaches" and "Melancholy Baby" -- were less successful, although "Heartaches" peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 and eventually sold over one million copies worldwide. In August 1961, due to problems encountered in the Deep South while touring because of the group being bi-racial, the white members, Knauss and Bricker left and were replaced by Allen Johnson (brother of Fred) and Walt Maddox. Mundy left soon after, leaving the group a quartet. In 1962, Harp and Allen Johnson left, and were replaced by Richard Harris and William Herndon. There was a brief reunion of the original members in 1973. The group made several recordings in 1975 with Harp back on lead. Original member Gene Bricker died in 1983. Allen Johnson died in 1995. By the early 1990s the group included Johnson, Maddox, Harris, Jules Hopson, and Richard Merritt. The group split around 1995. Fred Johnson formed his own group with new members, while the other four members recruited new bassist Ted Smith. Maddox won a lawsuit against Sunny James Svetnic, the manager of Johnson's group, for trademark infringement in 1996. Johnson reunited with Harp, Mundy, and Knauss in 1999 for the PBS special Doo Wop 50. The Marcels were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. In Brazil, their greatest hit, "Blue Moon", was the opening theme from the soap opera production O Beijo do Vampiro, from TV Globo network, exhibited between 2002 and 2003. Their original lead singer, Cornelius Harp, died in 2013.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 10305

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Published Date : 2013-05-03T16:32:48.000Z

With neither Ruffin brother experiencing significant success in the wake of their non-simultaneous departure from the Temptations, Jimmy latched upon the idea of recording a duet album with the younger David -- partially as a way to pay tribute to their recently passed parents, partially as a way to jump-start their stalled careers. In regards to the latter, 1970's I Am My Brother's Keeper was no great shakes, barely scraping the pop charts and its lead single "Stand by Me" only reaching 24 on the R&B charts, but as a testament to the familial talents of the Ruffins, the LP succeeds, proving that these two great voices could enliven familiar tunes. It's a knack that's needed here, for much of I Am My Brother's Keeper consists of splashy, sequin-studded and polyester-draped covers of pop and R&B hits. Just under half of the album consists of versions of tunes by the Hollies, Ben E. King, the Delfonics and Tyrone Davis, with the rest of the record coming from in-house Motown writers and elsewhere, including the rousing Gloria Jones co-write "When My Love Hand Comes Down." This is one of five Bobby Taylor productions on the LP, and he gives the Ruffins soulful, funky sounds that showcase them at their best, with Henry Cosby, Duke Browner, Frank Wilson and Al Kent responsible for the songs that edge a little closer to the pop charts. Combined, all the producers provide a sampler of Motown sounds at the dawn of the '70s -- sometimes things are deeply funky, sometimes things are slick enough for a televised variety revue -- but the Ruffins pull it all together, sounding comfortable in every setting, always commanding attention. Perhaps its underwhelming commercial performance is understandable -- there are no true knockouts here, just a bunch of strong soul -- but I Am My Brother's Keeper is an album that seems stronger in retrospect, as it was the last time one of the great brother teams in soul sung together so joyfully. [Hip-O Select's 2010 reissue adds the excellent unreleased "You're What I Need (Not What I Want)" -- produced by Bobby Taylor and co-written by Gloria Jones and Pamela Sawyer -- and a mix of "Stand by Me" that removes the fake live overdubs of the original.]
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 22878

Likes : 159

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Published Date : 2013-10-25T12:02:09.000Z

The Orioles were a successful and influential American R&B group of the late 1940s and early 1950s, one of the earliest such vocal groups who established the basic pattern for the doo-wop sound. The Orioles are generally acknowledged as R&B's first vocal group. Baltimore natives, they blended rhythm with group harmonies. Dubbing themselves after Maryland's state bird, the Orioles started the trend of bird groups (The Cardinals, The Crows, The Flamingos, The Larks, The Penguins, The Ravens, The Wrens, etc.).[1] They brought their winning formula to their first charted hit "It's Too Soon To Know"; a #1 record in November 1948, soon followed by the group's second hit, "(It's Gonna Be A) Lonely Christmas", in December that same year
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 8619

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Published Date : 2013-05-15T09:38:40.000Z

Rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 14042

Likes : 106

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Published Date : 2014-06-24T01:17:23.000Z

KGFJ, Los Angeles - Hunter Hancock Cruisin' was an American Rock-and-Roll and pop music sampler series covering the years 1955-1970 released by Increase Records, originally in the early 1980's on vinyl, and in 1993 on CD and audio cassette. The covers were stylized after the works of pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. The series was special in that each album purported to be an authentic roughly 40-minutes recording of a contemporary radio station from that year, complete with contemporary ads, station jingles, and a radio DJ from that era introducing each song, reading out local news, and inviting the listeners to join in competitions.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 41624

Likes : 381

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Published Date : 2013-11-04T11:17:58.000Z

The Del-Vikings (also known as The Dell-Vikings) are an American doo-wop musical group, who recorded several hit singles in the 1950s, and continued to record and tour with various lineups in later decades. The group was notable for being one of the few racially integrated musical groups to attain success in the 1950s. The Del-Vikings were formed in 1955 by members of the United States Air Force stationed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, with Clarence Quick, Kripp Johnson, Don Jackson, Samuel Paterson, and Bernard Robertson. Because all of the members were in the armed forces, the group constantly ran the risk of being disrupted by members being stationed in other places. This happened soon after the group's forming when Paterson and Robertson were sent to Germany. They were replaced by baritone David Lerchey, the group's first white member, and tenor Norman Wright. Norman Wright had started a group with Lawrence "Prince" Lloyd called The Valverteens from Amarillo Air Force Base,Texas before joining The Del-Vikings. The origin of the band's name is unclear. Some sources say that the band members had read about Vikings[1][2] with the prefix "Del" being "added to give the group name an air of mystery."[2] Another suggestion is that Clarence Quick had known of a basketball team in Brooklyn, New York, called the Vikings and had suggested the name.[1] The name may also have originated from the popular Viking Press, publisher of paperbacks that group members liked to read.[2] Originally signed to Fee Bee Records, their first hit came in 1957 with "Ultra High Fidelity" (Dot EP DEP 1058) followed by the Wright-led "Come Go with Me". The group quickly found itself in greater demand following the release of "Come Go with Me", which propelled the group into the Top 10 on Billboard's pop chart. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. Soon after, Jackson left and was replaced by Gus Backus, the group's second white member.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 3516

Likes : 24

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Published Date : 2014-07-22T03:18:09.000Z

"Donna the Prima Donna" is a song written by Dion DiMucci and Ernie Maresca and performed by Dion. The song reached #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #17 on the R&B chart in 1963. The song appeared on his 1963 album, Donna the Prima Donna. The song was produced by Robert Mersey and arranged by DiMucci. The backing group on the song is The Del-Satins. The song was ranked #86 on Billboard magazine's Top Hot 100 songs of 1963.
    

Channel Title : Manny Mora

Views : 1060

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Published Date : 2014-11-03T04:54:36.000Z

Band tittle song
    

Channel Title : FuzzyAqua

Views : 32

Likes : 2

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Published Date : 2016-10-10T21:00:16.000Z

Link: Manny Mora
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 26611

Likes : 307

DisLikes : 7

Published Date : 2013-11-16T16:08:36.000Z

Bronx sextet the Excellents originally formed as the Premiers in 1960, and with an original lineup of brothers John Kuse and George Kuse, plus Denis Kestenbaum, Phil Sanchez, Joel Feldman, and Chuck Epstein, quickly transformed into the Excellents. The group caught the ear of Vinny Catalano of Sinclair Records, who hustled the Excellents into the studio in 1961, where they recorded an uptempo version of Al Jolson's 1926 standard "Red Red Robin," which was eventually issued on Mermaid Records. The group also recorded a rocked-up cover of the Cleftones' "You Baby You," which came out in 1961 on Blast Records with a Catalano original, "Coney Island Baby," on the B-side. A year later, DJs in the New York area began flipping the record and playing the B-side, and "Coney Island Baby" ended up cracking the Top 20 nationally in 1962. Unfortunately, not much else was heard from the Excellents, whose official final single, "I Hear a Rhapsody," released on Blast in 1963, was actually recorded by another group called the Ultimates. An unofficial last single ("Helene"/"Sunday Kind of Love") by the original Excellents appeared on Bobby Records a year later under the group name the Excellons. The enduring popularity of "Coney Island Baby," which has become an acknowledged doo wop classic, has led to a recent touring version of the Excellents. Now a quartet, and still featuring the lead vocals of original member John Kuse, the group also lists Mal Bronson, John Accardo, and Joe Noto as current members.
    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 1778

Likes : 30

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2018-05-14T06:14:42.000Z

Saludos de los mejores pilotos de motocross en la República Dominicana
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5059

Likes : 74

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Published Date : 2014-06-29T12:04:11.000Z

The group formed in Chicago in 1952, originally as "Pirkle Lee and the Five Stars". It comprised Pirkle Lee Moses Jr. (lead vocals), Louis Bradley and Arthur Basset (tenors), Jewel Jones (second tenor/baritone), James Maddox and Richard Nickens (both baritone/bass). When Moses Jr. got out of the United States Air Force in 1954, they changed their name to The El Dorados. Vivian Carter heard them and signed them to her Vee-Jay Records label, making their first recordings in mid 1954. After a string of unsuccessful singles, they recorded "At My Front Door" (also known as "Crazy Little Mama") in 1955, and it rose to # 1 on the US Billboard R&B chart, and # 17 on the US pop chart. Their follow-up, "I'll Be Forever Loving You", also made the R&B top ten in early 1956. After Basset and Nickens left the group, they continued to record as a quartet. The original group split up in 1957. Moses stayed in Chicago and formed a new version of The El Dorados with members of another group, The Kool Gents. Meanwhile, Bradley, Jones and Maddox moved to California, and renamed themselves The Tempos. The label dropped The El Dorados in 1958, and Moses Jr. subsequently toured with a succession of backing vocalists. In 1969, he resuscitated the group name with new members, at the same time as a former member of The Tempos, Johnny Carter, also toured with another set of El Dorados. The two competing groups merged in the late 1970s, and subsequently continued to tour and record as The El Dorados until Moses' death in 2000. After Moses's death, Norman Palm, a longtime member since the late 1970s, took over and renamed the group Pirkle Lee Moses Jr's El Dorados, in tribute to his long-time colleague and friend. As of 2008, Pirkle Lee Moses Jr's El Dorados actively tours the Midwest, and the East Coast from time to time.
    

Channel Title : fernando Sanchez

Views : 525

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Published Date : 2017-06-13T14:17:16.000Z

Ensu motocros 250cs Color azul
    

Channel Title : sandro Gómez Fermin

Views : 385

Likes : 5

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Published Date : 2018-01-22T01:16:19.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 21919

Likes : 178

DisLikes : 9

Published Date : 2013-10-09T10:26:19.000Z

"Cross My Heart" - Lyrics I cross my heart, And I hope to die, If I should ever, Ever make you cry. 'Cause you're my all, Darling, you're a part of me. I swear by every, Every star above, I'll be with you. Please take my love. You're everything, Everything a love can be. I tread the world, Of the treasures of your charms. My dear, I'll never be free. Be with me right here in my arms. You're my queen, you'll always be. I swear, I swear, By all that's real, No love but yours, I'll ever feel. I cross my heart, And if I lie, I hope to die. (Instrumental break) I cross my heart, And if I lie, I hope to die. Songwriter(s): Henderson, David J. Mattis, Heygood, Don Robey, Pinchback John Marshall Alexander was born in Memphis, Tennessee and his father was a preacher in Tennessee. After serving in the navy during the Korean War, Alexander joined Adolph Duncan's Band as a pianist. He then joined the B. B. King band. Soon King departed for Los Angeles and vocalist Bobby Bland joined the army. Alexander took over vocal duties and renamed the band The Beale Streeters, also taking over King's WDIA radio show. Becoming "Johnny Ace", he signed to Duke Records (originally a Memphis label associated with WDIA) in 1952. Urbane 'heart-ballad' "My Song," his first recording, topped the R&B charts for nine weeks in September. ("My Song" was covered in 1968 by Aretha Franklin, on the flipside of "See Saw".) Ace began heavy touring, often with Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton. In the next two years, he had eight hits in a row, including "Cross My Heart," "Please Forgive Me," "The Clock," "Yes, Baby," "Saving My Love for You," and "Never Let Me Go." In December, 1954 he was named the Most Programmed Artist of 1954 after a national DJ poll organized by U.S. trade weekly Cash Box. Ace's recordings sold very well for those times. Early in 1955, Duke Records announced that the three 1954 Johnny Ace recordings, along with Thornton's "Hound Dog", had sold more than 1,750,000 records. After touring for a year, Ace had been performing at the City Auditorium in Houston, Texas on Christmas Day 1954. During a break between sets, he was playing with a .22 caliber revolver. Members of his band said he did this often, sometimes shooting at roadside signs from their car. It was widely reported that Ace killed himself playing Russian roulette. Big Mama Thornton's bass player Curtis Tillman, however, who witnessed the event, said, "I will tell you exactly what happened! Johnny Ace had been drinking and he had this little pistol he was waving around the table and someone said 'Be careful with that thing...' and he said 'It's okay! Gun's not loaded...see?' and pointed it at himself with a smile on his face and 'Bang!' -- sad, sad thing. Big Mama ran out of the dressing room yelling 'Johnny Ace just killed himself!" Thornton said in a written statement (included in the book The Late Great Johnny Ace) that Ace had been playing with the gun, but not playing Russian roulette. According to Thornton, Ace pointed the gun at his girlfriend and another woman who were sitting nearby, but did not fire. He then pointed the gun toward himself, bragging that he knew which chamber was loaded. The gun went off, shooting him in the side of the head. According to Nick Tosches, Ace actually shot himself with a .32 pistol, not a .22, and it happened little more than an hour after he had bought a brand new 1955 Oldsmobile. Ace's funeral was on January 9, 1955, at Memphis' Clayborn Temple AME church. It was attended by an estimated 5000 people. "Pledging My Love" became a posthumous R&B No. 1 hit for ten weeks beginning February 12, 1955. As Billboard bluntly put it, Ace's death "created one of the biggest demands for a record that has occurred since the death of Hank Williams just over two years ago." His single sides were compiled and released as The Johnny Ace Memorial Album.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 1789

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Published Date : 2015-10-10T07:43:42.000Z

In the Running is the fifth album by British pop musician Howard Jones, released in 1992. It was his last original studio album recorded on the Warner/Elektra label. It contains the US Top 40 hit "Lift Me Up". The album marked a conscious move away from the use of electronic instrumentation and a move to piano based melodies. Guests on the album include Midge Ure and Mark Brzezicki. Rupert Hine was the album's executive producer (he produced Howard's multi-million selling albums Human's Lib and Dream Into Action). A successful acoustic tour took place in 1992 with Howard playing all over Europe and the USA on grand piano accompanied by Carol Steele on percussion. The album was remastered and released on CD (with a host of extra tracks) for the first time in 2012.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4158

Likes : 50

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-10-18T10:22:07.000Z

This vocal group from Cleveland, Ohio, USA, comprised Charles Carruthers (lead), Lester Russaw (first tenor), Sam Griggs (second tenor), George Lewis (second tenor), William Griggs (bass) and Tony King (guitarist). The Coronets, like the Moonglows, tried to grab the brass ring of success, but unlike their more famous Cleveland counterparts never went beyond one-hit-wonderdom. Their lone success, the languorous ballad, ‘Nadine’ (number 3 R&B), became a staple of Chess anthology albums and in 1970 was revived by the Dells for Chess Records with great success. The Coronets have their origin in Thomas Edison High School in Cleveland, and began their foray into the entertainment world in early 1953 with only four songs in their repertoire. One was an original, ‘Nadine’ (written by Carruthers). They took the demo to Alan Freed, who then introduced them to Chess. The failure of subsequent releases and the draft served to splinter the group. The Coronets in later regroupings released records in Stirling and RCA’s Groove subsidiary in 1955, and on the Job label in 1960, but the group could not recapture the magic that made ‘Nadine’ a memorable hit.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 17654

Likes : 251

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Published Date : 2013-11-05T04:14:36.000Z

The Solitaires are an American doo wop group, best remembered for their 1957 hit single, "Walking Along". Formed in Harlem in 1953, the band consisted of Herman Curtis, Buzzy Willis and Pat Gaston (who had previously been together in another group, The Crows), and Monte Owens, Bobby Baylor and Bobby Williams (formerly of The Mello-Moods). They were signed to the Old Town record label, from which they issued a series of singles. These included "Wonder Why", "Blue Valentine", and a cover version of the jazz standard, "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You", all released in 1954. When Curtis (who was lead singer) left the group in 1955, he was replaced by Milton Love (formerly of the Concords), and it was with Love that the Solitaires enjoyed their greatest success. A string of hits throughout the latter part of the 1950s included "The Wedding" (1955), "The Angels Sang" (1956), and "Walking Along" (1957), which was later recorded by The Diamonds. The group released their final single in 1961, before disbanding. Various Solitaires line-ups have toured since 1961, and continue to do so to the present day. Currently, the group is made up of Milton Love, Freddy Barksdale, George Magnezid and Robbie Mansfield. Monte Owens died on March 3, 2011 in Bronx, New York, after a long illness, at the age of 74.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 451

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Published Date : 2015-10-16T13:15:37.000Z

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 245581

Likes : 1552

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Published Date : 2013-11-02T10:56:57.000Z

The Channels were an American doo wop group from New York City. The Channels formed in 1955 around the singers Larry Hampden, Billy Morris, and Edward Doulphin; they started as a quintet with two additional part-time members, but soon after they permanently added Earl Michael Lewis and Clifton Wright, formerly of The Lotharios. Lewis was the group's main songwriter, writing (among others) their regional hit "The Closer You Are" (1956). The Channels recorded for record labels Gone, Fury, Port, Hit, Enjoy, and Groove. The lineup changed several times over the course of the band's lifetime. They enjoyed significant regional success on the East Coast but never charted a major nationwide hit. Frank Zappa covered "The Closer You Are" on his album Them or Us (1984).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 37139

Likes : 370

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Published Date : 2013-11-11T17:17:11.000Z

The Skyliners were best known for their 1959 hit "Since I Don't Have You". Popular covers by Trini Lopez, Chuck Jackson, Don McLean, Guns N' Roses, The Brian Setzer Orchestra, Ronnie Milsap, Art Garfunkel and Buckaroo Banzai kept the song in the public consciousness. They also hit the Top 40 with "This I Swear" and "Pennies from Heaven". Other classics include "It Happened Today" (1959), "Close Your Eyes" (1961) and "Comes Love" (1962). The original group dissolved in 1963, but re-united eleven years later (without Jack Taylor), for what would become their last charted record, "Where Have They Gone?" In 1965, Jimmy Beaumont recorded two notable singles for the Bang label: the first, "Tell Me" b/w "I Feel Like I'm Falling in Love", were pleasant medium-tempo soul-styled tracks. For his second Bang 45, "I Never Loved Her Anyway" b/w "You Got Too Much Going for You", Jimmy transformed into an impressive soul singer, sounding nothing like his previous more pop styled efforts, leading some to question in later years, if it actually was his singing. These two tracks are now considered Northern Soul collectibles. The second 45 was also issued on UK London HLZ 10059 in 1966. Jack Taylor was drafted in 1965. In 1975, Wally Lester and Joe Versharen left the group; they were replaced by new members Jimmie Ross and bass Bob Sholes. In 1978, Detroit producer Don Davis who produced Marilynn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr., Johnny Taylor, the Dramatics, and the Dells -- picked up one of his favorite groups (the Skyliners) to record in his United Sound Studios. They recorded the group's "comeback" album for the RCA subsidiary, Tortoise International Records. The songs "Oh, How Happy" and "The Love Bug" were included, as was a hefty re-make of Dan Schafer's original RCA Victor single, "A Day Without You, Dear". Tragically, Janet Vogel committed suicide in 1980; Cathy Cooper joined the group as a replacement. She and Ross left two years later to form a duo; they were replaced by Rick Morris and Donna Groom. Morris retired in 1993; In 1993, David Proch was singing with another group. At first listen, the Skyliners' original lead singer, Jimmy Beaumont, invited Proch to join the group; Proch joined as a replacement. Also performing with the group at this time was Tom Sholes, brother of Bob Sholes. The two were local to the group; they attended St George High School in the Allentown neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The group became Beaumont, Groom, Proch, and Nick Pociask. David Proch, at age 44, the third person to sing first tenor for the Skyliners, died Monday Oct 19, 1998 in a car accident. His car collided with a truck hauling asphalt on U.S. Route 30 near Ligonier, about 45 miles east of Pittsburgh. Proch's place was taken by Dick Muse, a former member of The Laurels. Rick Morris replaced Muse in 2011. Today, Jimmy Beaumont performs with The Skyliners in their current line-up of Nick Pociask, Rick Morris, and Donna Groom (whose husband, Mark Groom, has been the group's drummer/conductor for more than 25 years). Two of the original members have died — Janet Vogel (suicide) in 1980 (aged 37), and Joe Verscharen of cancer in 2007 (aged 67). Their longtime manager and producer Joe Rock, who also co-wrote "Since I Don't Have You", died on April 4, 2000, at age 63, after complications from quadruple bypass heart surgery.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6184

Likes : 43

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Published Date : 2013-10-27T05:24:35.000Z

The Flamingos began life as the Swallows, a group of fellow churchgoers who began streetcorner singing in the Windy City with lead Earl Lewis, later of the Channels. Based around the Carey "cousins" (who grew up together but were not actually related), they soon replaced Lewis with Sollie McElroy, a coworker of Zeke's at the local Montgomery Ward department store. When their original manager was drafted, he secured as his replacement Billy Ward and the Dominoes' manager, and after a name change to the Flamingos (to avoid confusion with a Baltimore group of the same name), the group was a local hit. Unfortunately, years of church singing and ballads had left them a little too polished for hard R&B, and although the classic "Golden Teardrops" broke in New York, the group had no national hits. They soldiered on, weathering the death of their manager, the departure of several members, various label moves, and a Pat Boone cover ("I'll Be Home") that blocked them from pop success even as it got them noticed on black radio. Eventually, George Goldner signed them to End Records and refashioned them after the Platters, resulting in the 1959 smash "I Only Have Eyes For You." As black music became harder, however, the Flamingos found it hard to repeat their successes in the early Sixties; infighting over various solo projects led to the splintering of the group. Terry Johnson kept the name alive through 1964 with new members, and the Careys recorded unsuccessfully with various "Flamingos" through the Seventies and Eighties. Today, only two original members of the group remain alive -- Johnson and Hunt. Johnson, having fought off trademark infringement from Jake's son J.C., now owns the rights to the name and tours with a revamped version of the group to this day.
    

Channel Title : Sanborn Chevrolet

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Published Date : 2018-01-27T23:33:53.000Z

Manny Mora Sanborn Chevrolet IT number 209-334-5000 www.sanbornchevrolet.com
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 14770

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Published Date : 2014-06-24T12:20:15.000Z

WMCA, New York - B. Mitchell Reed Cruisin' was an American Rock-and-Roll and pop music sampler series covering the years 1955-1970 released by Increase Records, originally in the early 1980's on vinyl, and in 1993 on CD and audio cassette. The covers were stylized after the works of pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. The series was special in that each album purported to be an authentic roughly 40-minutes recording of a contemporary radio station from that year, complete with contemporary ads, station jingles, and a radio DJ from that era introducing each song, reading out local news, and inviting the listeners to join in competitions.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 1895

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Published Date : 2014-10-02T07:58:56.000Z

This R&B vocal group, formed in Chicago, Illinois, USA, in 1951, was renowned for producing the tightest and most gorgeous harmonies of the rock ‘n’ roll era. For much of their history they consisted of Zeke Carey (24 January 1933, Bluefield, Virginia, USA), Jake Carey (b. 9 September 1926, Pulaski, Virginia, USA), Paul Wilson (b. 6 January 1935, Chicago, Illinois, USA, d. May 1988) and Johnny Carter (b. 2 June 1934, Chicago, Illinois, USA). The group’s first lead was Sollie McElroy (b. 16 July 1933, Gulfport, Mississippi, USA, d. 15 January 1995), who brought the group regional fame on ‘Golden Teardrops’ for the Chance label in 1954. He was replaced by Nate Nelson (b. 10 April 1932, Chicago, Illinois, USA, d. 10 April 1984) who brought the group into the rock ‘n’ roll era with the magnificent ballad ‘I’ll Be Home’, a number 5 R&B hit in 1956 on Chess Records. There then followed a period of disarray, in which Carter and Zeke Carey were lost to the draft. The Flamingos brought into the group Tommy Hunt (b. 18 June 1933, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA) and Terry Johnson (b. 12 November 1935, Baltimore, Maryland, USA) and moved to New York where they signed with End Records in 1958. At this stage of their career the Flamingos had their biggest US hits, ‘Lovers Never Say Goodbye’ (R&B number 25 in 1958), ‘I Only Have Eyes For You’ (R&B number 3 and pop number 11 in 1959), ‘Nobody Loves Me Like You’ (R&B number 23 and pop Top 30 in 1960), the latter song written by Sam Cooke. One of the group’s last outstanding records was ‘I Know Better’ (1962), a Drifters’ sound-alike that captured top spots in many markets. During the early 60s the Flamingos lost the rest of their original members, except for Jake and Zeke Carey. The cousins managed to achieve some minor hits during the soul era, notably ‘Boogaloo Party’, which was the group’s only UK chart hit when it reached number 26 in 1969 (three years earlier it was a US R&B number 22 hit). The Flamingos’ last US chart record was ‘Buffalo Soldier’ 1970 (R&B Top 30). Nate Nelson died in 1984 and Paul Wilson in 1988. Sollie McElroy, after leaving the Flamingos in 1955, joined the Moroccos, with whom he recorded for three years, and Johnny Carter joined the Dells in 1960.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 37581

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Published Date : 2013-04-30T04:12:25.000Z

.''After Dark'' is an album by Andy Gibb. It was his final studio album, and was released in 1980. With drugs impeding his previous ability to write and even fully sing the tracks on his own record, Gibb was only able to forge his performance with nearly intrusive support from brother Barry. In March 1980 the last of Gibb's Top Ten singles charted just ahead of the album's release. "Desire" was originally recorded for the Bee Gees' 1979 album ''Spirits Having Flown'' but had Andy record new lead vocals replacing those of Barry's. A single, "I Can't Help It", a duet with family friend Olivia Newton-John, reached the Top Twenty. The album's poor performance, coupled with Gibb's mounting drug problems, would lead to RSO Records dropping Gibb from its roster. On VH1's Behind the Music, label founder Robert Stigwood said that he was heartbroken at having to make the decision to drop Gibb, but that his behaviour gave him very little choice. Although the album is not currently in print, it was released to iTunes along with the other two Andy Gibb albums in 2011
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 42094

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Published Date : 2013-11-10T23:56:55.000Z

Jacob Carey (Jake) and Ezekial Carey (Zeke), bass and 2nd tenor, respectively, formed the group in Chicago, Illinois, after meeting cousins baritone Paul Wilson and first tenor John E. "Johnny" Carter at a Hebrew Israelite congregation. Earl Lewis (not the Channels lead) soon joined, and after a series of name changes, (The Swallows, El Flamingos, The Five Flamingos), wound up being known as The Flamingos. Sollie McElroy soon replaced Lewis (who joined The Five Echoes). The Flamingos' first single (for Chance Records), "If I Can't Have You", was a moderate local success, as was the follow-up "That's My Desire", but it was Johnny Carter's composition of "Golden Teardrops," with its complex vocal harmonies and Carter's soaring falsetto, that cemented their reputation as a top regional act of the day. The Flamingos left Chance Records sometime after their December 1953 session and signed with DJ Al Benson's Parrot Records. Sollie McElroy was on their first Parrot session, but left the group in December 1954, to be replaced by tenor Nate Nelson (who was on their second Parrot session; he's lead on "I'm Yours," released in January 1955). In early 1955, the Flamingos signed with Chess Records, to record for their Checker Records subsidiary. At Chess/Checker, the Flamingos achieved their first national chart hit with "I'll Be Home", which went to #5 on Billboard's R&B chart (Pat Boone's cover version, complete with incorrect lyrics, was a hit on the pop charts).[citation needed] The group also had moderate success for the label with other chestnuts like "A Kiss From Your Lips," "The Vow," and "Would I Be Crying". The Flamingos also appeared in the 1956 Alan Freed movie, Rock, Rock Rock. Both Zeke Carey and Carter were drafted that year (Carter was drafted in September). Nate Nelson, Jake Carey, and Paul Wilson continued the group with new member Tommy Hunt (added in October 1956). Another new member, tenor/lead, guitarist, and arranger Terry "Buzzy" Johnson, joined in late December of that year. This group (Nate Nelson, Tommy Hunt, Terry Johnson, Paul Wilson, and Jake Carey) began recording for Decca Records in April 1957. Their most notable single was Johnson's arrangement of "The Ladder of Love", but legal entanglements between Checker and Nate Nelson ruined any chance of commercial success.[citation needed] Zeke Carey returned to the Flamingos in 1958, making the group a sextet. (When Johnny Carter was discharged from the service, he joined The Dells, performing with them for almost 50 years until his death in 2009.) Zeke and Jake Carey were not blood-related, but were considered cousins, because of Zeke being adopted by Jake's aunt and uncle. That year, the Flamingos began recording for George Goldner's End Records in New York City, where they had several national hits. Almost immediately, the group had their first pop chart hit with "Lovers Never Say Goodbye", written by Terry Johnson, who shared lead chores on the song with Paul Wilson. The formula was a winner as Terry and Paul also led three of the 12 songs selected for their first album Flamingo Serenade - George Gershwin's "Love Walked In", "But Not For Me" and "Time Was". The Flamingos would have their biggest seller in 1959 with another old standard from that LP, on which Nate Nelson handled lead chores. "I Only Have Eyes for You" (written in 1934 by composer Harry Warren and lyricist Al Dubin for the film Dames) became their biggest seller, and has been featured in dozens of movies and TV shows. A long series of hits followed, including the Johnson-penned "Mio Amore", Doc Pomus' composition "Your Other Love", "Nobody Loves Me Like You" (written for the group by Sam Cooke), and "I Was Such a Fool". LP cuts "Love Walked In" and "Time Was" were also issued as singles.[citation needed] That same year, they appeared in the Alan Freed movie, Go, Johnny, Go, singing a frenetic version of "Jump Children" (originally recorded for Chance Records in the early days). The group became known almost as much for their stage show and choreography as for their harmonies. Groups including The Temptations and The Tavares would later credit the group as major influences.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2014-07-09T10:08:26.000Z

Eugene Dixon, 6 July 1937, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Recalled for the gauche but irresistible 1962 US number 1, 'Duke Of Earl', Chandler's million-selling single in fact featured the Dukays, a doo-wop quintet he fronted (Eugene Dixon, Shirley Jones, James Lowe, Earl Edwards and Ben Broyles). His record company preferred to promote a solo artist and thus one of soul's most enduring careers was launched. Temporarily bedevilled by his 'dandy' image, the singer was rescued by a series of excellent Curtis Mayfield -penned songs, including 'Rainbow' and 'Man's Temptation'. These were hits in 1963, but the relationship blossomed with 'Just Be True' (1964) and the sublime 'Nothing Can Stop Me' (1965), both US Top 20 singles. Chandler later recorded under the aegis of producer Carl Davis, including '(The) Girl Don't Care', 'There Goes The Lover' and 'From The Teacher To The Preacher', a duet with Barbara Acklin. Switching to Mercury Records in 1970, 'Groovy Situation' became another major hit, while an inspired teaming with Jerry Butler was an artistic triumph. Chandler's career was revitalized during the disco boom when 'Get Down' was an international hit on Chi-Sound (Chandler was also a vice-president for the label). Further releases, 'When You're Number 1' and 'Does She Have A Friend', consolidated such success, while recordings for Salsoul, with Jaime Lynn and Fastfire, continued his career into the 80s.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 28865

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Published Date : 2013-11-01T10:30:43.000Z

With their elegant, intricate and flawless vocal arrangements, the Flamingos are widely regarded as one of the best vocal groups in music history. The graceful vocals and sharp choreography of Motown's biggest stars -- the Temptations, the Supremes, the Jackson 5 and the Miracles among them -- owe a debt to the Flamingos, as do such paragons of Philadelphia soul as the Spinners, and Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes. Although many of the Flamingos' recordings did not make the pop charts or even get heard beyond a regional fan base, they have with hindsight acquired a reputation as vocal-group classics. In particular, their third single, "Golden Teardrops," has been hailed as "the most perfect-sounding single of all time" and "a legendary masterpiece." Yet it failed to reach the national pop charts upon its initial release in 1953, and a reissue eight years later stalled at Number 108. Still, the Flamingos put 11 singles on the pop chart and nine singles on the R&B chart between 1956 and 1970. Two of those singles made the Top 10: "I'll Be Home" (Number Five R&B) and "I Only Have Eyes For You" (Number Three R&B and Number 11 pop). The Flamingos formed in 1952 in Chicago, where they sang in a church choir. Somewhat uniquely, the congregation to which founding members Jake Carey, Zeke Carey, Paul Wilson and Johnnie Carter belonged was the black Jewish Church of God and Saints of Christ. Having mastered the minor-key melodies of Jewish hymns, they retained this influence when they began singing pop and R&B. Initially known as the Swallows, then the Five Flamingos, and eventually just the Flamingos, they became a quintet with the addition of Earl Lewis. They signed to the Chicago-based Chance label in 1953. By then, they had a new lead vocalist, Sollie McElroy, who was discovered at a talent show. They recorded in a variety of styles, including midtempo ballads ("Someday, Someway"), lowdown blues ("Blues in a Letter"), pop standards ("That's My Desire") and jump tunes ("Jump Children"). From Chance, they moved to Parrot, where they recorded a handful of singles, including the ballad "Dream of a Lifetime" and the uptempo "Ko Ko Mo," and acquired yet another lead singer, Nate Nelson. In 1955, they signed with Chess Records and released records on its Checker subsidiary. Their third 45 for Checker was "I'll Be Home," a dramatic ballad in which a serviceman promises a loved one that he'll return. It became their first R&B smash and would've no doubt been a big mainstream hit, too, had Pat Boone not rushed out a pallid cover version. Deejay Alan Freed thought highly enough of the Flamingos to include them in two of his late-Fifties rock and roll flicks: Rock, Rock, Rock (in which they performed "Would I Be Crying") and Go Johnny Go! ("Jump Children"). In 1958, the group moved to George Goldner's End Records, and they moved from Chicago to New York City as well. Their lineup now consisted of Zeke and Jake Carey, Paul Wilson, Nate Nelson, new singer Tommy Hunt and guitarist/singer Terry Johnson, the Flamingos cut some of their most enduring sides for End, including the exquisite "Lovers Never Say Goodbye" and their satiny signature song, "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Number Three R&B, Number 11 pop). The latter, originally a 1934 hit for Ben Selvin, is one of the most sublime and enduring vocal-group recordings of all time. While at End, the Flamingos released four albums, including Flamingo Serenade, a masterful album of pop standards by Cole Porter, George Gershwin and others. Although the Flamingos' popularity tailed off in the Sixties with the rise of the British Invasion bands, they continued recording and performing down the decades. After the deaths of cousins Jake and Zeke Carey, Terry Johnson continued to lead and perform with a new line-up of the Flamingos.
    

Channel Title : MrMannyiscool1

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Published Date : 2013-06-11T01:15:03.000Z

Like*Comment*Subscribe
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4521

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Published Date : 2014-07-09T09:06:55.000Z

They formed in The Bronx, New York, in 1959. Group members included Guy Villari on lead; Sal Cuomo, first tenor; Chuck Fassert, second tenor; Tony Gravagna, sax player/baritone; Don Jacobucci on bass. An earlier version of the group from 1957 was called The Monterays, and included Villari, Cuomo, Fassert and Ernie Maresca (who later had a hit with "Shout, Shout — Knock Yourself Out", and also wrote songs such as the Regent's "Runaround" and "The Wanderer" recorded by Dion). The group recorded demos in Bell Sound, Associated, and Regent Sound studios. They were signed to Seville Records as The Desires, however, none of the songs they recorded were released, until the group had success three years later as The Regents. The Regents' name came from a combination of recording a demo at Regent Sound studio, and the fact that Villari smoked Regents cigarettes. In 1958 the group recorded Villari's "A Teenager's Love". At the same recording session they waxed "Barbara-Ann" in three takes. Shortly afterwards, Tony Gravagna, was installed into the group. Unable to secure a recording contract, they disbanded about a year later. Eddie Jacobucci revived the Regents by accident. His group, the Consorts, lacked original songs for an audition, so they recorded a version of "Barbara-Ann". The owner of Cousins Records heard the track and decided to release the original version by the Regents. The original group reunited, and Cousins released "Barbara-Ann" in March 1961. It became a No. 1 record in New York; the demand was such that Cousins leased it to Roulette/Gee for worldwide distribution, and it reached #13 in the Billboard Hot 100. Their follow-up release, "Runaround", went to #28 on the pop chart and #30 R&B. They released two more records for Gee, but after a royalties dispute with the record label, the group broke up. They reformed in 1973 with Villari the only remaining original member. The group enjoyed success in concerts group and toured across the States. In 1988 they were selected as one of only four "oldies" groups to appear on the Grammy Awards Show. The Cadillacs, The Flamingos and The Angels were the other three. In 1995 a new group of Regents was formed. Along with Villari, Tony Valitutto, Frank Civatillo and Tony Cacase made up the vocals, while Richard Rogers, Joel DeRuggiero and Sal DiCicco provided the instrumentation.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5630

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Published Date : 2013-05-14T00:35:06.000Z

Rare song from David's ''Motown Solo Albums'' Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : wilsonsphoto

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Published Date : 2013-03-08T04:07:29.000Z

Manny Mora PUC Talent Show 2013
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 54801

Likes : 472

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Published Date : 2014-07-02T05:12:13.000Z

The group, which originally formed in Spanish Harlem, New York, in 1955, was first known as "The Harlem Queens". The girls first met while singing at the Glee Club at P.S. 109 in Spanish Harlem. They were soon discovered by James Dailey, a record producer, who also became their manager, while playing a concert at the Apollo Theater's amateur night, and were signed to a recording contract on the Atlantic Record Label. The girls lived in the housing projects of 1905 Second Ave and 99th Street and sang in the hallways of the building and downstairs in the playground. In 1957, the girls released their first hit single, "Mr. Lee," an uptempo song in which the narrator proclaims her devotion to her crush - her school teacher. The girls actually disliked the real-life Mr. Lee and the original lyrics to the song were something of a put-down, but Atlantic insisted the group revise the lyrics before recording the song. The single, backed by "Look at the Stars," became their biggest hit recording, peaking at #6 on the Billboard Pop singles chart and spending four weeks at #1 on the R&B chart. This made the Bobbettes the first girl group to release a #1 R&B hit that also made the pop top 10. The song would later be covered by Diana Ross on the European version of her 1987 album Red Hot Rhythm & Blues. the personnel on "Mr Lee" included Jesse Powell on tenor sax, Allan Hanlon and Al Caiola on guitar, Ray Ellis on piano, Milt Hinton on bass, and Joe Marshall on drums. After a series of novelty songs for Atlantic that were unsuccessful, they recorded the original recording of "I Shot Mr. Lee". Atlantic refused the song and the group left the label and signed with Teddy Vann and a new version was issued on the small Triple-X label. It started to climb the charts rapidly, eventually reaching #52 on the Billboard Hot 100, and Atlantic was forced to release their own version of the song. Over the next few years they followed up that single with such other recordings as "I Shot Mr. Lee," "Have Mercy Baby," "You Are My Sweetheart," "You Belong to Me," and "Dance with Me Georgie." They then signed with the End and released the songs "Teach Me Tonight" and "I Don't Like It Like That" (answer to Chris Kenner's "I Like It Like That".) Although the recording of "I Don't Like It Like That" was the girls' last chart-topper, they continued to record for a series of record labels, including Diamond, RCA Victor and Mayhew, before disbanding in 1974. They also toured the oldies circuits for many years after their breakup. Other recordings by the Bobbettes include, "Oh My Pa-Pa," "Speedy," "Zoomy," and "Rock and Ree-ah-Zole (The Teenage Talk)." Their single of "I've Gotta Face The World" on RCA Victor is a valuable Northern Soul single. In 1980, Jannie Pought was stabbed to death by a stranger in New Jersey. The Bobbettes were nominated for induction in the Vocal Group Hall of Fame.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 94448

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Published Date : 2013-05-04T14:27:22.000Z

It's well known that Motown recorded more material than it could release, but its reasons for shelving material remain a mystery to this day. Ever since the CD reissue boom of the late '80s, this unreleased material has begun to trickle out of the vaults, and when it does surface in such forms as the dynamite double-disc set A Cellarful of Motown!, the music is so good it's hard to believe that it never was released at the time. Knowing this, it should not come as a complete surprise that former Temptations lead singer David Ruffin had a full, completed album shelved in 1971, but hearing Hip-O Select's excavation of that album on the 2004 release David: The Unreleased Album, it's still a wonder that this record sat in the vaults for over three decades, with very few of the songs recorded during the sessions appearing on other records and compilations over the years. Far from being unreleasable, David (titled as such because the album was never given a proper title -- it was given a catalog number and track sequencing, with David Ruffin penciled in as its name, but that was used as the title for his 1973 album) finds Ruffin at a solo peak, not just a singer but in terms of material. He cut the 12 songs that comprised the album, along with the seven bonus tracks from the same sessions that fill out this CD reissue, in late 1969 and 1970, after he had a big solo hit with "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)," with the intent of releasing the album in 1971. There were a pair of covers of recent hits -- an appropriately heartbroken and seductive "Rainy Night in Georgia" and a rather revelatory "I Want You Back," which added real grit to the Jackson 5's effervescent smash -- but most of this was material written for Ruffin and it played to his strengths. While this music was rooted in Motown's signature sound and performed by the Funk Brothers, it also looked beyond Detroit, adding heavy doses of funk, psychedelia, and smooth soul, filled with galvanizing horns, driving guitars, down-n-dirty clavinets, flourishes of electric sitar, fuzz tones, and wah-wah guitars, all grounded by Ruffin's earthy testifying and tied together by top-notch songwriting. All these elements wound up sounding much hipper than much of the music officially released by Motown in the early 1970, when Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye were just beginning to break free of the studio's formula, and while David and its accompanying bonus tracks are not a masterpiece along the lines of Talking Book or What's Going On (or even Where I'm Coming From, for that matter), it's vibrant, exciting music that still sounds fresh -- arguably fresher than full-length Temptations albums of the late '60s -- which qualifies it as a lost classic of sorts. Why was it lost, consigned to the vaults for nearly three and a half decades? According to the liner notes, nobody really knows. Ruffin wasn't popular among the executives at Motown in the early '70s, and he was also going through a number of well-documented personal problems, so it's possible that Motown simply didn't want to promote him at the time, but it's also true that the label had a number of great records, including Marvin's What's Going On, to release in 1971, and Ruffin had two LPs out in 1970, including a duet album with his brother Jimmy, so the market may have been saturated. We'll likely never know the reason why David was buried, but fortunately it has been unearthed, and it's a reason for hardcore soul and Motown fans to celebrate.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-07T00:13:44.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.

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