Manny Mora....!

About 20 results out of 56936 (0.23 seconds)
    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 7879

Likes : 68

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2018-07-09T18:09:36.000Z

Manny Mora dominó las 2 manga
    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 3369

Likes : 45

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2018-06-04T12:24:23.000Z

Piña darnell lantigua vs manny mora la Vega 2018 video 4k
    

Channel Title : cesar lopez

Views : 5116

Likes : 101

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2017-11-01T00:20:58.000Z

    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 487

Likes : 5

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2018-05-14T20:57:25.000Z

Salida Manny Mora
    

Channel Title : Edward Fabian

Views : 458

Likes : 8

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-05-29T02:41:30.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 11344

Likes : 124

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-10-31T05:06:57.000Z

One of the most highly regarded American Doo Wop groups from the mid 1950s. Their records are highly sought by hardcore oldies collectors. The group featured here are best remembered for their 1955 east coast hit "Lily Maebelle". Although they never had a record on the national hit parades, they were extremely popular in New York and the East Coast in general and had many regional big sellers. The stage performances of the group were sellouts and their harmonizing and choreography in sequence were amongst the most accomplished of their time. Influenced both musically and in their showmanship by The Cadillacs, The Solitaires, and The Flamingos, The Valentines were able to contribute an innovative stage presentation, outstanding vocals, and some unique performances. The Valentines served as a launching pad for important careers. Their brilliant choreography made them one of the most cherished groups on the East Coast. The group first formed in 1952 in the Sugar Hill district of Harlem as a quartet, harmonizing on the corner of 151st Street and Amsterdam Avenue. The original group comprised Raymond "Pop" Briggs (first tenor), Carl Hogan (second tenor), Mickey Francis (baritone), and Ronnie Bright (bass) calling themselves The Mistletoes; sometime afterwards they changed their names to The Dreamers.
    

Channel Title : Decor produccion

Views : 29

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-08-27T21:27:22.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 197741

Likes : 1377

DisLikes : 44

Published Date : 2013-05-02T14:21:38.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 18888

Likes : 123

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-05-04T13:17:44.000Z

It's well known that Motown recorded more material than it could release, but its reasons for shelving material remain a mystery to this day. Ever since the CD reissue boom of the late '80s, this unreleased material has begun to trickle out of the vaults, and when it does surface in such forms as the dynamite double-disc set A Cellarful of Motown!, the music is so good it's hard to believe that it never was released at the time. Knowing this, it should not come as a complete surprise that former Temptations lead singer David Ruffin had a full, completed album shelved in 1971, but hearing Hip-O Select's excavation of that album on the 2004 release David: The Unreleased Album, it's still a wonder that this record sat in the vaults for over three decades, with very few of the songs recorded during the sessions appearing on other records and compilations over the years. Far from being unreleasable, David (titled as such because the album was never given a proper title -- it was given a catalog number and track sequencing, with David Ruffin penciled in as its name, but that was used as the title for his 1973 album) finds Ruffin at a solo peak, not just a singer but in terms of material. He cut the 12 songs that comprised the album, along with the seven bonus tracks from the same sessions that fill out this CD reissue, in late 1969 and 1970, after he had a big solo hit with "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)," with the intent of releasing the album in 1971. There were a pair of covers of recent hits -- an appropriately heartbroken and seductive "Rainy Night in Georgia" and a rather revelatory "I Want You Back," which added real grit to the Jackson 5's effervescent smash -- but most of this was material written for Ruffin and it played to his strengths. While this music was rooted in Motown's signature sound and performed by the Funk Brothers, it also looked beyond Detroit, adding heavy doses of funk, psychedelia, and smooth soul, filled with galvanizing horns, driving guitars, down-n-dirty clavinets, flourishes of electric sitar, fuzz tones, and wah-wah guitars, all grounded by Ruffin's earthy testifying and tied together by top-notch songwriting. All these elements wound up sounding much hipper than much of the music officially released by Motown in the early 1970, when Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye were just beginning to break free of the studio's formula, and while David and its accompanying bonus tracks are not a masterpiece along the lines of Talking Book or What's Going On (or even Where I'm Coming From, for that matter), it's vibrant, exciting music that still sounds fresh -- arguably fresher than full-length Temptations albums of the late '60s -- which qualifies it as a lost classic of sorts. Why was it lost, consigned to the vaults for nearly three and a half decades? According to the liner notes, nobody really knows. Ruffin wasn't popular among the executives at Motown in the early '70s, and he was also going through a number of well-documented personal problems, so it's possible that Motown simply didn't want to promote him at the time, but it's also true that the label had a number of great records, including Marvin's What's Going On, to release in 1971, and Ruffin had two LPs out in 1970, including a duet album with his brother Jimmy, so the market may have been saturated. We'll likely never know the reason why David was buried, but fortunately it has been unearthed, and it's a reason for hardcore soul and Motown fans to celebrate.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 59172

Likes : 483

DisLikes : 12

Published Date : 2013-05-08T17:00:03.000Z

In My Stride is the final Van McCoy/David Ruffin collaboration. McCoy surrounded Ruffin's harsh, expressive tenor with strings, horns, New York studio musicians, and Faith, Hope & Charity's slick backing vocals. So much to choose from... "You're My Peace of Mind" is a deceptive groover, accented by an electric harmonica; "Questions" is an unsung gem, Ruffin at his pleading, inquisitive best. On the ballad side, "Just Let Me Hold You For a Night" is a majestic production and one of David's best leads, a gripper from the first note. But there's more: "Hey Woman" and "Rode By the Place (Where We Used to Stay)" are mature, introspective heartache sagas. It's about time Motown did us a favor and compiled all the Ruffin/McCoy sides on one CD package.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 24082

Likes : 168

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2013-10-25T12:02:09.000Z

The Orioles were a successful and influential American R&B group of the late 1940s and early 1950s, one of the earliest such vocal groups who established the basic pattern for the doo-wop sound. The Orioles are generally acknowledged as R&B's first vocal group. Baltimore natives, they blended rhythm with group harmonies. Dubbing themselves after Maryland's state bird, the Orioles started the trend of bird groups (The Cardinals, The Crows, The Flamingos, The Larks, The Penguins, The Ravens, The Wrens, etc.).[1] They brought their winning formula to their first charted hit "It's Too Soon To Know"; a #1 record in November 1948, soon followed by the group's second hit, "(It's Gonna Be A) Lonely Christmas", in December that same year
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 20634

Likes : 160

DisLikes : 5

Published Date : 2013-05-08T00:33:02.000Z

In My Stride is the final Van McCoy/David Ruffin collaboration. McCoy surrounded Ruffin's harsh, expressive tenor with strings, horns, New York studio musicians, and Faith, Hope & Charity's slick backing vocals. So much to choose from... "You're My Peace of Mind" is a deceptive groover, accented by an electric harmonica; "Questions" is an unsung gem, Ruffin at his pleading, inquisitive best. On the ballad side, "Just Let Me Hold You For a Night" is a majestic production and one of David's best leads, a gripper from the first note. But there's more: "Hey Woman" and "Rode By the Place (Where We Used to Stay)" are mature, introspective heartache sagas. It's about time Motown did us a favor and compiled all the Ruffin/McCoy sides on one CD package.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6679

Likes : 57

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2013-05-07T16:49:14.000Z

[BONUS TRACK] From David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol. 2 As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 37050

Likes : 216

DisLikes : 12

Published Date : 2013-05-06T14:31:59.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 9259

Likes : 75

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-06T15:26:38.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 9026

Likes : 67

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2015-10-07T16:46:31.000Z

''One to One'' is the third album by British pop musician Howard Jones, released in October 1986. The CD release also contains the single version of "No One Is to Blame" (a song featured on his previous album) with Phil Collins on backing vocals and drums. The album contained the hits "You Know I Love You...Don't You?" (US top twenty) and "All I Want" (top 40 in many European countries). The album went gold in a number of European territories including the UK and Ireland.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 503948

Likes : 4281

DisLikes : 101

Published Date : 2013-11-15T09:23:52.000Z

The Marcels were an American doo-wop group known for turning popular music songs into rock and roll. The group formed in 1959 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and signed to Colpix Records, with lead Cornelius Harp, bass Fred Johnson, Gene Bricker, Ron Mundy, and Richard Knauss. The group was named after a popular hair style of the day, the marcel wave, by Fred Johnson's younger sister Priscilla. In 1961 many were surprised to hear a new version of the ballad "Blue Moon", that began with the bass singer saying, "bomp-baba-bomp" and "dip-da-dip." The record sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. It is featured in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. The disc went to number one in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and UK Singles Chart.[5] In the U.S., additional revivals in the same vein as "Blue Moon" -- "Heartaches" and "Melancholy Baby" -- were less successful, although "Heartaches" peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 and eventually sold over one million copies worldwide. In August 1961, due to problems encountered in the Deep South while touring because of the group being bi-racial, the white members, Knauss and Bricker left and were replaced by Allen Johnson (brother of Fred) and Walt Maddox. Mundy left soon after, leaving the group a quartet. In 1962, Harp and Allen Johnson left, and were replaced by Richard Harris and William Herndon. There was a brief reunion of the original members in 1973. The group made several recordings in 1975 with Harp back on lead. Original member Gene Bricker died in 1983. Allen Johnson died in 1995. By the early 1990s the group included Johnson, Maddox, Harris, Jules Hopson, and Richard Merritt. The group split around 1995. Fred Johnson formed his own group with new members, while the other four members recruited new bassist Ted Smith. Maddox won a lawsuit against Sunny James Svetnic, the manager of Johnson's group, for trademark infringement in 1996. Johnson reunited with Harp, Mundy, and Knauss in 1999 for the PBS special Doo Wop 50. The Marcels were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. In Brazil, their greatest hit, "Blue Moon", was the opening theme from the soap opera production O Beijo do Vampiro, from TV Globo network, exhibited between 2002 and 2003. Their original lead singer, Cornelius Harp, died in 2013.
    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 3980

Likes : 65

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2018-05-14T06:14:42.000Z

Saludos de los mejores pilotos de motocross en la República Dominicana
    

Channel Title : Mx Dominicano

Views : 4288

Likes : 31

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2017-04-03T15:25:03.000Z

#mxdominicano @mxdominicano en instagram y en en Facebook Mx Dominicano síguenos en nuestras redes y no olvides suscribirte...
    

Channel Title : sandro Gómez Fermin

Views : 518

Likes : 5

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-01-22T01:16:19.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 11709

Likes : 93

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-07-15T11:34:52.000Z

The Swallows are an American R&B group. They are best known for their 1951 recording of "Will You Be Mine", which appeared in the US Billboard R&B chart. Founded in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1946 as the 'Oakaleers', the original members were Lawrence Coxson (lead tenor), Irving Turner (tenor and baritone), Earl Hurley (first and second tenor and bongos) and Norris "Bunky" Mack (bass, piano, guitar, and drums). The 'Oakaleers' practised on street corners until around 1948, when they joined with Eddie Rich (first tenor) and Frederick "Money Guitar" Johnson (baritone and guitar). Second tenor and baritone Herman "Junior" Denby was hired later. Irving Turner stopped singing with the group, but was kept on as valet (and occasional fill-in). The Swallows' recording of "Will You Be Mine" was released in 1951, and was one of the first doo-wop hits. "Will You Be Mine" reached a peak position of Number 9 on the US Billboard R&B chart. In 1952, the Swallows released "Beside You", which became their second national hit, peaking at Number 10 on the Billboard R&B chart. Eddie Rich and the Swallows are still performing at clubs and cabarets. Herman "Junior" Denby died on July 14th 2013, in West Chester Township, Butler County, Ohio, from pneumonia and Alzheimer's disease. He was aged 82.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 16888

Likes : 212

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2014-07-03T04:26:58.000Z

The Collegians were an American 1950s doo-wop group from New York City. They recorded for the Harlem-based record producer, Paul Winley. The Collegians biggest hit, "Zoom Zoom Zoom," was released in 1958. Other Collegians' charted hits include "Right Around The Corner," "The One You Love," "Hold Back the Night," and "Let's Go For a Ride." The Marcels later used the intro to "Zoom Zoom Zoom" as the intro to their 1961 smash hit, "Blue Moon."
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4360

Likes : 51

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-10-18T10:22:07.000Z

This vocal group from Cleveland, Ohio, USA, comprised Charles Carruthers (lead), Lester Russaw (first tenor), Sam Griggs (second tenor), George Lewis (second tenor), William Griggs (bass) and Tony King (guitarist). The Coronets, like the Moonglows, tried to grab the brass ring of success, but unlike their more famous Cleveland counterparts never went beyond one-hit-wonderdom. Their lone success, the languorous ballad, ‘Nadine’ (number 3 R&B), became a staple of Chess anthology albums and in 1970 was revived by the Dells for Chess Records with great success. The Coronets have their origin in Thomas Edison High School in Cleveland, and began their foray into the entertainment world in early 1953 with only four songs in their repertoire. One was an original, ‘Nadine’ (written by Carruthers). They took the demo to Alan Freed, who then introduced them to Chess. The failure of subsequent releases and the draft served to splinter the group. The Coronets in later regroupings released records in Stirling and RCA’s Groove subsidiary in 1955, and on the Job label in 1960, but the group could not recapture the magic that made ‘Nadine’ a memorable hit.
    

Channel Title : Sanborn Chevrolet Lodi

Views : 11

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-01-27T23:33:53.000Z

Manny Mora Sanborn Chevrolet IT number 209-334-5000 www.sanbornchevrolet.com
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 60445

Likes : 552

DisLikes : 17

Published Date : 2014-07-02T05:12:13.000Z

The group, which originally formed in Spanish Harlem, New York, in 1955, was first known as "The Harlem Queens". The girls first met while singing at the Glee Club at P.S. 109 in Spanish Harlem. They were soon discovered by James Dailey, a record producer, who also became their manager, while playing a concert at the Apollo Theater's amateur night, and were signed to a recording contract on the Atlantic Record Label. The girls lived in the housing projects of 1905 Second Ave and 99th Street and sang in the hallways of the building and downstairs in the playground. In 1957, the girls released their first hit single, "Mr. Lee," an uptempo song in which the narrator proclaims her devotion to her crush - her school teacher. The girls actually disliked the real-life Mr. Lee and the original lyrics to the song were something of a put-down, but Atlantic insisted the group revise the lyrics before recording the song. The single, backed by "Look at the Stars," became their biggest hit recording, peaking at #6 on the Billboard Pop singles chart and spending four weeks at #1 on the R&B chart. This made the Bobbettes the first girl group to release a #1 R&B hit that also made the pop top 10. The song would later be covered by Diana Ross on the European version of her 1987 album Red Hot Rhythm & Blues. the personnel on "Mr Lee" included Jesse Powell on tenor sax, Allan Hanlon and Al Caiola on guitar, Ray Ellis on piano, Milt Hinton on bass, and Joe Marshall on drums. After a series of novelty songs for Atlantic that were unsuccessful, they recorded the original recording of "I Shot Mr. Lee". Atlantic refused the song and the group left the label and signed with Teddy Vann and a new version was issued on the small Triple-X label. It started to climb the charts rapidly, eventually reaching #52 on the Billboard Hot 100, and Atlantic was forced to release their own version of the song. Over the next few years they followed up that single with such other recordings as "I Shot Mr. Lee," "Have Mercy Baby," "You Are My Sweetheart," "You Belong to Me," and "Dance with Me Georgie." They then signed with the End and released the songs "Teach Me Tonight" and "I Don't Like It Like That" (answer to Chris Kenner's "I Like It Like That".) Although the recording of "I Don't Like It Like That" was the girls' last chart-topper, they continued to record for a series of record labels, including Diamond, RCA Victor and Mayhew, before disbanding in 1974. They also toured the oldies circuits for many years after their breakup. Other recordings by the Bobbettes include, "Oh My Pa-Pa," "Speedy," "Zoomy," and "Rock and Ree-ah-Zole (The Teenage Talk)." Their single of "I've Gotta Face The World" on RCA Victor is a valuable Northern Soul single. In 1980, Jannie Pought was stabbed to death by a stranger in New Jersey. The Bobbettes were nominated for induction in the Vocal Group Hall of Fame.
    

Channel Title : Motos y Juegos RD

Views : 30

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-08-21T23:10:24.000Z

#99 suscríbanse y llegarán más videos de motocross y demás
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 9726

Likes : 102

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-15T09:38:40.000Z

Rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 28169

Likes : 338

DisLikes : 7

Published Date : 2013-11-16T16:08:36.000Z

Bronx sextet the Excellents originally formed as the Premiers in 1960, and with an original lineup of brothers John Kuse and George Kuse, plus Denis Kestenbaum, Phil Sanchez, Joel Feldman, and Chuck Epstein, quickly transformed into the Excellents. The group caught the ear of Vinny Catalano of Sinclair Records, who hustled the Excellents into the studio in 1961, where they recorded an uptempo version of Al Jolson's 1926 standard "Red Red Robin," which was eventually issued on Mermaid Records. The group also recorded a rocked-up cover of the Cleftones' "You Baby You," which came out in 1961 on Blast Records with a Catalano original, "Coney Island Baby," on the B-side. A year later, DJs in the New York area began flipping the record and playing the B-side, and "Coney Island Baby" ended up cracking the Top 20 nationally in 1962. Unfortunately, not much else was heard from the Excellents, whose official final single, "I Hear a Rhapsody," released on Blast in 1963, was actually recorded by another group called the Ultimates. An unofficial last single ("Helene"/"Sunday Kind of Love") by the original Excellents appeared on Bobby Records a year later under the group name the Excellons. The enduring popularity of "Coney Island Baby," which has become an acknowledged doo wop classic, has led to a recent touring version of the Excellents. Now a quartet, and still featuring the lead vocals of original member John Kuse, the group also lists Mal Bronson, John Accardo, and Joe Noto as current members.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 91132

Likes : 748

DisLikes : 21

Published Date : 2014-10-28T11:01:05.000Z

The Coasters were one of the few artists in rock history to successfully straddle the line between music and comedy. Their undeniably funny lyrics and on-stage antics might have suggested a simple troupe of clowns, but Coasters records were no mere novelties -- their material, supplied by the legendary team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, was too witty, their arrangements too well-crafted, and the group itself too musically proficient. That engaging and infectious combination made them one of the most popular early R&B/rock & roll acts, as well as one of the most consistently entertaining doo wop/vocal groups of all time. The Coasters grew out of a successful Los Angeles doo wop group called the Robins, which had been recording since 1949 and working with Leiber & Stoller since 1953. Atlantic Records acquired the Robins in 1955, when the Leiber & Stoller composition "Smokey Joe's Cafe" was becoming too big a hit for their small Spark label to handle; its success scored the duo an independent contract with Atlantic as producers and composers. Amid uncertainties over their new major-label arrangement, the Robins split up that fall; lead tenor Carl Gardner (a more recent addition) and bass Bobby Nunn formed a new group, The Coasters (named for their West Coast base), which maintained the Leiber & Stoller association -- an extremely wise move. The initial Coasters lineup was completed by baritone Billy Guy (a gifted comic vocalist) and second tenor Leon Hughes, with guitarist Adolph Jacobs figuring prominently on their recordings through 1959. Their first single, "Down in Mexico," became a Top Ten R&B hit in 1956, epitomizing the sort of humorous story-song Leiber & Stoller were perfecting. The Coasters hit again in 1957 with the double-sided smash "Young Blood"/"Searchin'," both sides of which reached the pop Top Ten. The follow-ups weren't as successful, and it was decided that both the group and Leiber & Stoller would move their operations to New York, where Atlantic was based. As a result, Nunn and Hughes left the group in late 1957, to be replaced respectively by bass Will "Dub" Jones (ex-Cadets, of "Stranded in the Jungle" fame) and second tenor Obie Jessie (for a very short period), then Cornell Gunter (ex-Flairs). The Coasters' first recording in New York was 1958's "Yakety Yak," which featured King Curtis on tenor sax. Its witty, slice-of-life lyrics about a teenager being hassled by his parents struck a resounding chord, and "Yakety Yak" became The Coasters' first number-one pop hit that summer, topping the R&B charts as well. "Charlie Brown," which cast Jones in the title role of class clown (and immortalized him with the catch-phrase, "why's everybody always pickin' on me?"), hit number two on both the pop and R&B charts in 1959, firmly establishing The Coasters' widespread crossover appeal. More hits followed: the Western-themed "Along Came Jones," "Poison Ivy," "Shoppin' for Clothes," and the group's final Top 30 hit, 1961's burlesque-dancer tribute "Little Egypt." Following "Little Egypt," Gunter departed, to be replaced by Earl "Speedo" Carroll (of the Cadillacs). Other personnel shifts ensued over the next few years, especially as the hits dried up; even more discouragingly, Leiber & Stoller left Atlantic in 1963. The Coasters parted ways with Atlantic in early 1966, signing with Columbia's Date subsidiary and reuniting with Leiber & Stoller for a time. Although they charted several times, no more hits were forthcoming, given the radically different musical climate; their last chart single was a 1971 cover of "Love Potion No. 9" (by which time Gardner was the only remaining original member), and their last new release came with a 1976 version of "If I Had a Hammer." Since then, numerous different Coasters lineups have toured the oldies circuit; Gardner's holds the legal claim to legitimacy, but Gunter, Guy, Jones, Nunn, and Hughes all led differing lineups at one point or another. Nunn died of a heart attack in 1986, one year before The Coasters became the first vocal group inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Gunter was murdered in Las Vegas in 1990, and Jones passed away in early 2000.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 82726

Likes : 811

DisLikes : 27

Published Date : 2013-10-30T12:59:32.000Z

The Jacks also known as the Cadets. The members were Aaron Collins (the brother of Betty and Rosie Collins who recorded as The Teen Queens), Willie Davis, Austin "Ted" Taylor, baritone Lloyd McGraw and bass singer Will "Dub" Jones. Ted Taylor, who left the group in early 1956 for a solo career, was replaced first by Prentice Moreland (who attended only one session and delivered the line "Great googa-mooga, let me outtahere," on "Stranded in the Jungle") and then by Pete Fox from The Flairs. Joe Bihari the boss man of the Modern Records empire in Los Angeles came up with the idea of having one group with a split personality, envisioning The Jacks as a ballad harmony group utilizing the writing talents of Aaron Collins, and The Cadets as an uptempo and novelty song quintet. As a rule, Dub Jones or Aaron Collins sang lead on the Cadets recordings, while tenor Willie Davis fronted the Jacks. Ted Taylor was also featured on three early songs. The band on most of the group's sessions was lead by tenor saxophonist Maxwell Davis. The Jacks/Cadets also backed up other artists, notably Young Jessie on "Mary Lou" and Richard Berry on "Jelly Roll" and "God Gave Me You." The Jacks first side was a cover of a tune by The Feathers called "Why Don't You Write Me". It proved to be a national hit record and introduced the sound of the group to a wide audience. The flip side, Charlie Calhoun's "Smack Dab In The Middle" was recorded as by The Cadets originally in keeping with the 'two groups in one' philosophy. When the ballad side began to break big in the pop field, a second pressing was hastily issued with a ballad now on the flip side - "My Darling". Two sides with the group backing up singer Donna Hightower were failures, as was their next single, but surprisingly the bouncy "How Soon" got some airplay and sales and the next ballad release "Why Did I Fall In Love" did well across the country but was not nearly as successful as the first recording by the group. By this time Bihari and Modern had given up on the Jacks part of the equation, and from that point on the group was exclusively known as The Cadets. The quintet's identity as The Cadets started as the musical cover group for the Modern label. Their first outing was a version of Nappy Brown's "Don't Be Angry", and the second release was a cover of The Marigolds "Rolling Stone". Then followed backup for Young Jesse and Dolly Cooper, an late blooming "Annie" song ("Annie Met Henry") and a double cover of Elvis ("Heartbreak Hotel") and The Willows ("Church Bells May Ring"). The next release was also a cover, but this time things were different. The cover of The Jayhawks "Stranded In The Jungle" took off like a rocket and went to the top of the R & B charts and also scored big on the pop charts. The Cadets never again achieved this measure of success issuing a string of covers such as Peppermint Harris "I Got Loaded" and "I'll Be Spinning" originally by Johnnie & Joe. By the turn of the new decade the Cadets had been ready to call it a career, but a new lineup of two members of the Cadets and two members of the Flairs became a new vocal group called The Flares (note the different spelling). The Flares were Aaron Collins, Willie Davis, Thomas Miller, and George Hollis and they signed to record for the Felsted label, a New York based label headed by Walt McGuire. "Loving You" and "Jump And Bump" were the first two releases and they went nowhere. The third recording was a charm - "Foot Stomping (parts one and two)" on Felsted #8624. This was a typical early sixties dance record with an energetic sound and it was a great seller getting into the top twenty pop records of the country. They followed it up with another two part record called "Rock And Roll Heaven" on a new label named Press, but that record failed to chart as did all subsequent releases by the group. There were six more recordings by The Flares on Press and none of them went anywhere. It was 1964 and the English Invasion was on and the end of the road for The Jacks / Cadets / Flares was at hand. So ended the story of the group that had a multi faceted appeal and saw some limited success during their years as a recording unit. They were certainly unique during their time as representatives of the music of America. Prentice Moreland, Aaron Collins, Ted Taylor and Lloyd McGraw are deceased. Willie Davis is considering a new version of The Jacks / Cadets possibly including Pete Fox. Dub Jones still lives in Los Angeles but, at last report, was not interested in returning to the stage.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 16540

Likes : 116

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2013-05-06T15:10:44.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : FuzzyAqua

Views : 41

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-10-10T21:00:16.000Z

Link: Manny Mora
    

Channel Title : Motocross Extremo Rd

Views : 2550

Likes : 22

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2018-06-04T01:54:02.000Z

Esta se dio buena
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 3882

Likes : 26

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-07-22T03:18:09.000Z

"Donna the Prima Donna" is a song written by Dion DiMucci and Ernie Maresca and performed by Dion. The song reached #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #17 on the R&B chart in 1963. The song appeared on his 1963 album, Donna the Prima Donna. The song was produced by Robert Mersey and arranged by DiMucci. The backing group on the song is The Del-Satins. The song was ranked #86 on Billboard magazine's Top Hot 100 songs of 1963.
    

Channel Title : Luis Mora

Views : 106069

Likes : 4377

DisLikes : 64

Published Date : 2017-07-31T02:41:47.000Z

Had a Great Sesh skating with Manny Santiago, Micky Papa, Torey Pudwill, & Vinnie Banh. Last Video: https://YouTube.com/watch?v=GvRWeZ627dk https://erasedproject.com | @ErasedXProject Manny built his skatepark in his back yard to practice for the Pro Skateboarding contest Street League. Manny's one of the most consistent skaters I've seen. It's insane how he flips into his rail tricks with such ease. Always hypes my up to skate with these dudes! Definitely sick to see so street league training in by these pros! Snapchat: luismoravids https://www.facebook.com/LuisMoraProd/ https://instagram.com/luismoravids - @LuisMoraVids Vinnie Banh: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCG0t1P17afwcH_kKswYwMnA Insta: @ErasedXProject, @LuisMoraVids, @VinnieBanh, @mannysantiago, @micky_papa, @toreypudwill, @mdmontgomery13
    

Channel Title : fernando Sanchez

Views : 692

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-06-13T14:17:16.000Z

Ensu motocros 250cs Color azul
    

Channel Title : vishome0910

Views : 115

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-02-21T04:58:16.000Z

dd
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6416

Likes : 44

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-10-27T05:24:35.000Z

The Flamingos began life as the Swallows, a group of fellow churchgoers who began streetcorner singing in the Windy City with lead Earl Lewis, later of the Channels. Based around the Carey "cousins" (who grew up together but were not actually related), they soon replaced Lewis with Sollie McElroy, a coworker of Zeke's at the local Montgomery Ward department store. When their original manager was drafted, he secured as his replacement Billy Ward and the Dominoes' manager, and after a name change to the Flamingos (to avoid confusion with a Baltimore group of the same name), the group was a local hit. Unfortunately, years of church singing and ballads had left them a little too polished for hard R&B, and although the classic "Golden Teardrops" broke in New York, the group had no national hits. They soldiered on, weathering the death of their manager, the departure of several members, various label moves, and a Pat Boone cover ("I'll Be Home") that blocked them from pop success even as it got them noticed on black radio. Eventually, George Goldner signed them to End Records and refashioned them after the Platters, resulting in the 1959 smash "I Only Have Eyes For You." As black music became harder, however, the Flamingos found it hard to repeat their successes in the early Sixties; infighting over various solo projects led to the splintering of the group. Terry Johnson kept the name alive through 1964 with new members, and the Careys recorded unsuccessfully with various "Flamingos" through the Seventies and Eighties. Today, only two original members of the group remain alive -- Johnson and Hunt. Johnson, having fought off trademark infringement from Jake's son J.C., now owns the rights to the name and tours with a revamped version of the group to this day.
    

Channel Title : MrMannyiscool1

Views : 38

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-06-11T01:15:03.000Z

Like*Comment*Subscribe
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 16297

Likes : 60

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-11T10:03:31.000Z

As the lead singer of the Temptations, Ruffin was one of the most urbane and charismatic singers around. His work as a solo act was spotty at best. Writers and producers at Motown had Ruffin screaming at the top of his lungs over everything from run over dogs to Dear John letters. A 1970 set with his brother Jimmy Ruffin and a trio of albums with producer Van McCoy in the late 70's were the only respite from a steep artistic decline. Ruffin left Motown in 1977. This 1980 album presents him as more of a love man and is the follow up to 1979's Soon We Change, also produced by Don Davis. The most striking thing about this effort is Ruffin's voice. Unlike other singers of the raspy/loud type, his voice actually improved and he didn't have to resort to howls to make up for a lost midrange. Producer Don Davis plugged Ruffin into a polished, contemporary R&B setting that featured, among others, Leon Ware and Ronnie McNeir on backing vocals. "I Got a Thing for You has Ruffin coming on smooth and confident as he sings, "Felt the feeling, without a touch." He even has to laugh. The dramatic "Can We Make Love One More Time" shows Ruffin didn't lose his cool while begging. Even the borderline unctuous "Don't You Go Home works even though his "love call" should have made his object of desire head for the exits. Gentleman Ruffin is Ruffin's last album as a solo act. Although there are a few weak spots, no comprehensive Rufiin collection should be without it
    

Channel Title : Luis Mora

Views : 101837

Likes : 5289

DisLikes : 92

Published Date : 2017-01-25T02:00:01.000Z

Manny Santiago Killed the famous Crenshaw 8 stair/rail as he warmed up! Subscribe for more videos! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKVLlDqtYDKTd5MYLy-JvZQ?sub_confirmation=1 Ehttps://erasedproject.com | @ErasedXProject Snapchat: luismoravids Eddie: https://www.youtube.com/user/eastoodaweside Manny: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC49GQEUGTIcG2As3FJU2gQQ Turkey: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-bV082RrWOHQrr4DU5AaoQ brett: https://www.youtube.com/user/brettconti https://www.facebook.com/LuisMoraProd/ https://instagram.com/luismoravids - @LuisMoraVids Insta: @ErasedXProject, @LuisMoraVids, @its_turkey, @marcosbrenes, @east2daweside
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 26578

Likes : 253

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2014-07-12T07:49:05.000Z

The Classics were a white harmony vocal group from Brooklyn, NY, similar to the Mystics or the Earls. Originally known as the Perennials, they consisted of Emil Stucchio on lead, Tony Victor as first tenor, Johnny Gambale as second tenor, and bass/baritone Jamie Troy. They'd been singing together in high school, two of them coming out of another local group called the Del-Rays, and became known in their neighborhood at dances and clubs. They turned professional after attracting the attention of manager Jim Gribble, and made their recording debut during the summer of 1959 with "Cinderella," a group original that showcased their range, from falsetto to bass with a rocking beat, and which just missed charting in early 1960. They failed to hit with their second single, "Angel Angela," and just missed the pop listings again with "Life Is But a Dream" in early 1961, though the latter record, after it was picked up by Mercury, earned a place on the R&B charts. Their next record, a version of "Blue Moon" cut with Herb Lance singing lead and the group members in a support role, made it to number 50 on Billboard's Hot 100. In 1963, the group switched to the Musicnote label and made the Top 20 their first time out for the newly founded company, with "Till Then." The latter remains their best-known record. The group's strength lay in their handling of ballads -- they loved reviving '20s and '30s standards such as "P.S. I Love You" and "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams," though they also wrote their share of songs; they were never quite as successful or distinctive doing numbers with more of a beat. One reason why they aren't better known today beyond the ranks of harmony vocal enthusiasts may have to do with the fact that the Classics were seldom on the same label for two releases in a row, moving among Dart, Musicnote, Stork, and other small companies, and only attracted a major label's interest the one time, with the Mercury pick-up of "Life Is But a Dream." And for every "Life Is But a Dream" that passed muster with R&B stations and listeners, they recorded three songs like the straight pop "Again." After "Till Then," they never made the pop charts, which was understandable -- rock & roll was changing and the kind of harmony vocal sound that was selling, rooted in the more focused West Coast-generated surf sound of the Beach Boys and in the flashier, more beat-driven work of the Four Seasons, was very different from the Classics' more elegant brand of harmonizing. Occasionally, as on "Portrait of a Fool" -- an original, no less -- they could deliver a pop ballad that crossed over to rock & roll successfully, but a lot of their other output couldn't compete with the sounds of the mid-'60s, next to which they sounded ever more dated. The group moved among labels throughout the 1960s without ever finding a home, and split up around 1966; by that time, their sound was very much an anachronism and there seemed to be little point to continuing. During the oldies boom of the early '70s, however, Stucchio and Troy joined with Lou Rotundo, originally from a rival Brooklyn group called the Passions, and formed a new vocal group called the Profits, who recorded briefly for Sire Records before changing their name to the Classics, under which they finished their career. Stucchio is still performing with a version of the Classics as of 2003, his lead voice one of the most beloved ever to come out of Brooklyn, and the group performs up and down the East Coast regularly. In 2001, Collectables Records released Till Then: The Very Best of the Classics, a 20-song compilation covering their history from 1959 through the late '60s.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 45850

Likes : 437

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2013-11-15T09:46:07.000Z

The group was formed in 1955 at Brooklyn's Abraham Lincoln High School, and was known first as the Linc-Tones. Originally featuring members Neil Sedaka, Hank Medress, Eddie Rabkin, and Cynthia Zolotin, Rabkin was replaced by Jay Siegel in 1956, and the band recorded its first single, "While I Dream" that same year. In 1957 Sedaka and Zolotin left the band, leaving only Siegel and Medress, who would recruit two additional band members and record the single "Picture in My Wallet" as Darrell & the Oxfords. Finally establishing its most famous name and crew, the band became known as the Tokens in 1960 after they recruited the 13-year-old multi-instrumentalist and first tenor Mitch Margo and his baritone brother Phil Margo. In early 1961, the Tokens released a single for Warwick Records entitled "Tonight I Fell In Love," which scored #15 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and earned them an opportunity to perform on the television program American Bandstand. The popularity that the band garnered as a result of this performance brought them new recording opportunities, culminating in their cover of Solomon Linda's "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" for RCA Victor Records. It reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, where it remained for three weeks. The same track peaked at #11 in the UK Singles Chart.[1] Both "Tonight I Fell in Love" and "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" sold more than one million copies, and were awarded gold discs. From 1962 to 1970, the group released nine more songs that scored the Top 100. Jay Siegel was the lead vocalist on all the Tokens' hits including "I Hear Trumpets Blow" (1966) and "Portrait of My Love" (1967). Beginning in 1963, the Tokens also began serving as record producers for other artists, such as The Chiffons, Randy & the Rainbows, and The Happenings. Their company was called Bright Tunes Productions and they also have their own record company, B. T. Puppy Records. In 1972, Jay Siegel did background vocals for a re-recording of Lion Sleeps Tonight with Robert John as the lead vocalist. In 1973, Medress ended his relationship with the group and Siegel teamed with the Margo Brothers to form the group Cross Country, which would have some success with its cover version of "In the Midnight Hour." The Tokens reunited during 1975 for occasional weeks as singing regulars on the Adam Wade hosted game show Musical Chairs and in 1978 recorded a song for ABC's Schoolhouse Rock named "A Victim of Gravity". Nowadays, brothers Mitch and Philip Margo continue to perform with new members Jay Leslie, Mike Johnson and Noah Margo (one of Margo's sons) playing drums. Mitch Margo's sons, Damien Margo and Ari Margo also make occasional guest performances with the band, exemplifying Phil Margo's saying that "If you hang around long enough you can grow your own band." Siegel continues to perform with his own version of the Tokens as well, featuring bass singer Bill Reid and, more recently, John "Jay" Traynor, the original lead singer (before Jay Black) of Jay & the Americans and The Mystics. Siegel's son is also part of the group as keyboardist and occasional vocalist. Jay Siegel's Tokens and the Margo brothers reunited in 2000 to perform on the PBS special, Doo Wop 51. At the time, Siegel's Tokens were Siegel, Reid, and Eddy Rezzonico;[6] Rezzonico had replaced Richie Grasso during the 1990s.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 12804

Likes : 104

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2014-07-03T11:27:25.000Z

Little Anthony & the Imperials enjoyed one of the longest career runs of any doo wop group, adapting their honey-smooth style to fit the sweet uptown soul sound of the mid-'60s. Right from the beginning, Little Anthony's aching way with a ballad was the group's calling card, but their repertoire was balanced by more R&B-inflected dance tunes. Little Anthony was born Jerome Anthony Gourdine in 1940, and grew up in Brooklyn's Fort Greene projects. While in high school, he sang in a doo wop group called the Duponts, who recorded a single called "Prove It Now" in 1957. They disbanded after graduation, however, and Gourdine joined another group called the Chesters, which had been formed by his friend Clarence Collins (baritone) and also featured longtime friend Ernest Wright, Jr. (tenor); the other members were Tracy Lord (tenor) and Nat Rogers (bass). After a one-off single for Apollo, they landed a record deal with the End label in 1958, at which point their name was changed to the Imperials. ("Little Anthony" was later tagged onto the beginning by DJ Alan Freed.) the Imperials' first single for End was the classic heartache ballad "Tears on My Pillow," a Top Five smash on both the pop and R&B charts. Little Anthony's dramatic interpretation was certainly helped in the public eye by his youthful-sounding voice and name, which recalled the recently popular Frankie Lymon. The single's B-side, "Two People in the World," was also something of a hit, making the Imperials one of the hottest vocal groups around. Landing a follow-up hit proved difficult, however; the group charted several singles -- "So Much," "Wishful Thinking," "A Prayer and a Juke Box" -- without even approaching their earlier success. Finally, the novelty dance track "Shimmy, Shimmy, Ko-Ko-Bop" caught on in 1960 and returned Little Anthony & the Imperials to the upper reaches of the charts (though it missed the Top Ten). The follow-ups "My Empty Room" and "Please Say You Want Me" flopped, however, and Little Anthony decided to try a solo career in late 1961. the Imperials continued on with a new lineup of Collins, Wright, Sammy Strain, and George Kerr, the latter of whom was replaced by Kenny Seymour in 1962. Neither Little Anthony nor his erstwhile group had any luck on their own, and in late 1963 he returned to the fold, replacing Seymour. The next summer, the reconstituted Imperials signed with the DCP label, where producer/songwriter Teddy Randazzo made them a priority. His first effort with the group, "I'm on the Outside (Looking In)," reached number 15 on both the pop and R&B charts in 1964, reestablishing the Imperials as a commercial presence. The follow-up, "Goin' Out of My Head," was a smash, returning them to the pop Top Ten for the first time since "Tears on My Pillow"; it was covered quite often in the years that followed, and grew into something of a pop standard. the Imperials' streak of good fortune continued with the equally dramatic ballad "Hurt So Bad," another Top Ten hit that also became their second R&B Top Fiver in 1965. A couple of smaller hits followed later that year in "I Miss You So" and the pop/R&B Top 20 "Take Me Back." Little Anthony & the Imperials continued to chart singles over the next several years, but only one -- 1969's "Out of Sight, Out of Mind" -- breached the Top 50 on either the pop or R&B sides. That same year, the group switched labels to United Artists, and Ernest Wright, Jr. departed to join singer Tony Williams' latter-day version of the Platters. He was replaced by a returning Kenny Seymour, who was in turn replaced by Bobby Wade in 1971, the year of the group's last chart single, "Help Me Find a Way (To Say I Love You)." Sammy Strain left in 1972 and wound up joining the O'Jays four years later; his replacement was Harold Jenkins. Little Anthony himself left the group a second time in 1975 to pursue solo recording as well as an acting career, which effectively spelled the end of the road; nonetheless, a Collins-led lineup did manage to score one last hit in the U.K., 1977's "Who's Gonna Love Me." Little Anthony became a born-again Christian in 1978 and subsequently recorded a gospel album, Daylight. Anthony, Collins, Wright, and Strain reunited in 1992 and toured the oldies circuit steadily thereafter.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 32942

Likes : 231

DisLikes : 13

Published Date : 2013-05-07T00:13:44.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.

YouAPI-1


Facebook Page Like Box ::