Manny Mora....!

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Channel Title : Mx Dominicano

Views : 2929

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Published Date : 2017-04-03T15:25:03.000Z

#mxdominicano @mxdominicano en instagram y en en Facebook Mx Dominicano síguenos en nuestras redes y no olvides suscribirte...
    

Channel Title : cesar lopez

Views : 2151

Likes : 50

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Published Date : 2017-11-01T00:20:58.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 9413

Likes : 96

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Published Date : 2013-10-31T05:06:57.000Z

One of the most highly regarded American Doo Wop groups from the mid 1950s. Their records are highly sought by hardcore oldies collectors. The group featured here are best remembered for their 1955 east coast hit "Lily Maebelle". Although they never had a record on the national hit parades, they were extremely popular in New York and the East Coast in general and had many regional big sellers. The stage performances of the group were sellouts and their harmonizing and choreography in sequence were amongst the most accomplished of their time. Influenced both musically and in their showmanship by The Cadillacs, The Solitaires, and The Flamingos, The Valentines were able to contribute an innovative stage presentation, outstanding vocals, and some unique performances. The Valentines served as a launching pad for important careers. Their brilliant choreography made them one of the most cherished groups on the East Coast. The group first formed in 1952 in the Sugar Hill district of Harlem as a quartet, harmonizing on the corner of 151st Street and Amsterdam Avenue. The original group comprised Raymond "Pop" Briggs (first tenor), Carl Hogan (second tenor), Mickey Francis (baritone), and Ronnie Bright (bass) calling themselves The Mistletoes; sometime afterwards they changed their names to The Dreamers.
    

Channel Title : sandro Gómez Fermin

Views : 183

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Published Date : 2018-01-22T01:16:19.000Z

    

Channel Title : Aqua Dream1

Views : 26

Likes : 2

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Published Date : 2016-10-10T21:00:16.000Z

Link: Manny Mora
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 21197

Likes : 147

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Published Date : 2013-10-25T12:02:09.000Z

The Orioles were a successful and influential American R&B group of the late 1940s and early 1950s, one of the earliest such vocal groups who established the basic pattern for the doo-wop sound. The Orioles are generally acknowledged as R&B's first vocal group. Baltimore natives, they blended rhythm with group harmonies. Dubbing themselves after Maryland's state bird, the Orioles started the trend of bird groups (The Cardinals, The Crows, The Flamingos, The Larks, The Penguins, The Ravens, The Wrens, etc.).[1] They brought their winning formula to their first charted hit "It's Too Soon To Know"; a #1 record in November 1948, soon followed by the group's second hit, "(It's Gonna Be A) Lonely Christmas", in December that same year
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 105974

Likes : 1013

DisLikes : 24

Published Date : 2014-11-02T06:03:20.000Z

"Tossin' and Turnin'" is a song written by Ritchie Adams and Malou Rene, and originally recorded by Bobby Lewis. The record reached number one on both the Billboard Hot 100 on July 10, 1961, and R&B chart, and has since become a standard on oldies compilations. It was named Billboard's number-one single for 1961, after spending seven consecutive weeks at the top. It was featured on the soundtrack for the 1978 film Animal House. On the original hit single version, the track begins with Lewis singing "I couldn't sleep at all last night," and it appears this way on most oldies compilations. However, on some releases the song has a prelude, where Lewis sings "Baby...Baby...you did something to me," followed by a musical cue into the first verse. Lewis usually includes this prelude when he performs the song live.the Personnel on the original hit recording included Ritchie Adams and Eric Gale on guitar, Bob Bushnell on bass, King Curtis on a tenor sax mouthpiece, Frank Haywood Henry on baritone sax, Paul Griffin on Piano and Sticks Evans on drums In 2008, Billboard magazine ranked the song as the 27th biggest song of all time that charted on the Billboard Hot 100, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the chart. It is one of only six songs from the 1960s to spend at least seven weeks in the number one position on the Billboard Hot 100.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 13207

Likes : 166

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Published Date : 2014-07-03T04:26:58.000Z

The Collegians were an American 1950s doo-wop group from New York City. They recorded for the Harlem-based record producer, Paul Winley. The Collegians biggest hit, "Zoom Zoom Zoom," was released in 1958. Other Collegians' charted hits include "Right Around The Corner," "The One You Love," "Hold Back the Night," and "Let's Go For a Ride." The Marcels later used the intro to "Zoom Zoom Zoom" as the intro to their 1961 smash hit, "Blue Moon."
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 25561

Likes : 191

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Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:46:12.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 79168

Likes : 790

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Published Date : 2014-07-02T10:42:54.000Z

The Channels formed in 1955 around the singers Larry Hampden, Billy Morris, and Edward Doulphin; they started as a quintet with two additional part-time members, but soon after they permanently added Earl Michael Lewis and Clifton Wright, formerly of The Lotharios. In early 1956 the group somehow got together with Bobby Robinson owner of Red Robin Records. The group signed a two year contract with Robinson's Whirlin Disc label. In their first recording session they were able to record "The Closer You Are" written by Earl Lewis who was only 15 at the time. "The Closer You Are" was an instant hit on the national airways, but because of poor distribution it never made the national charts. The song did become very popular on the East Coast and a New York street corner doo-wop favorite. The group's next release came in late 1956, the song was "The Gleam In Your Eye", also written by Lewis. The song showcased Lewis' full range of talent. The Channels recorded for record labels Gone, Fury, Fire. They enjoyed significant regional success on the East Coast but never charted a major nationwide hit. The group disbanded in late 1959, but in 1961 Jubilee Records started releasing Whirling Disc early releases as if they were new and The Channels became hot again. The lineup changed several times over the course of the band's lifetime.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 8789

Likes : 59

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2013-09-26T09:15:19.000Z

She is best remembered for her role of 'Buffy' on the television series "Family Affair". Born in West Lafayette, Indiana, her parents moved to San Diego County, California, when she was a small girl, settling in Playa del Rey, where she grew up. In 1966 she was cast as 'Elizabeth "Buffy" Patterson-Davis' in "Family Affair", playing the role until 1971. She had a brief cameo role in 1968 on television's Rowan and Martin "Laugh-In", which gave her an appetite for more acting roles, and in 1969, she won the role of 'Buffy Davis' in the motion picture "Roman Affair" (1969) and the role of 'Carol Bix' in "The Trouble with Girls" (1969). She tried out for the role of 'Regan' in "The Exorcist" (1973), but lost out to Linda Blair. Continuing with her schooling at Westchester High School from 1973 to 1976, she briefly worked at Winchell's Donut Shop in Playa del Rey, where she grew up. She died at the age of 18 of a drug overdose in 1976.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 8783

Likes : 106

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2014-07-20T12:02:19.000Z

This is first release by the Sevilles from late 1960, early 1961. "Charlena" hit the Billboard Top 100 and peaked at number 84. It is a great song that was played a lot in the Los Angeles area, and has been revived and performed by many other artists. It also was featured in at least one movie. The song "Charlena" was written by Manny Chavez and Sonny Chaney of the Jaguars, but they were never able to convince anyone that they should have recorded it. Their song Piccadilly had a similar sound to Charlena. The flip, "Loving You(Is My Desire)" was a great Doo Wop ballad. A fine two sider for the group. Shown above is the blue label promo. I have not yet seen a white label promo on this record. Here is the much more common stock issue of Charlena on JC 116. It stayed a total of five weeks on the billboard charts, and as mentioned got a lot of play in the Los Angeles area, though other stations like WIBG in Philadelphia and powerhouse WABC in New York, were both on it. One of the first stations to play It was KYA In San Francisco as a Pick Hit Of The Week on November 14th 1960. KRLA and KACY were also early adopters of the song. Sevilles member Ernest Hamilton is shown as the writer on the flip, "Loving You"(Is My Desire). Following up Charlena, was a song called "Louella" Though clearly shown as the "B" side to the record, it was the song that was supposed to get the spins, complete with the red x's pointing to the hot side. Sometimes, distributors would put stickers on the labels saying "Thanks" or "Play This Side." Salt Mine was another one written by Manny Chavez and Sonny Chaney of the Jaguars.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 15463

Likes : 140

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-07-24T03:16:58.000Z

The group formed in Chicago in 1952, originally as "Pirkle Lee and the Five Stars". It comprised Pirkle Lee Moses Jr. (lead vocals), Louis Bradley and Arthur Basset (tenors), Jewel Jones (second tenor/baritone), James Maddox and Richard Nickens (both baritone/bass). When Moses Jr. got out of the United States Air Force in 1954, they changed their name to The El Dorados. Vivian Carter heard them and signed them to her Vee-Jay Records label, making their first recordings in mid 1954. After a string of unsuccessful singles, they recorded "At My Front Door" (also known as "Crazy Little Mama") in 1955, and it rose to # 1 on the US Billboard R&B chart, and # 17 on the US pop chart. Their follow-up, "I’ll Be Forever Loving You", also made the R&B top ten in early 1956. After Basset and Nickens left the group, they continued to record as a quartet. The original group split up in 1957. Moses stayed in Chicago and formed a new version of The El Dorados with members of another group, The Kool Gents. Meanwhile, Bradley, Jones and Maddox moved to California, and renamed themselves The Tempos. The label dropped The El Dorados in 1958, and Moses Jr. subsequently toured with a succession of backing vocalists. In 1969, he resuscitated the group name with new members, at the same time as a former member of The Tempos, Johnny Carter, also toured with another set of El Dorados. The two competing groups merged in the late 1970s, and subsequently continued to tour and record as The El Dorados until Moses' death in 2000. After Moses's death, Norman Palm, a longtime member since the late 1970s, took over and renamed the group Pirkle Lee Moses Jr's El Dorados, in tribute to his long-time colleague and friend. As of 2008, Pirkle Lee Moses Jr's El Dorados actively tours the Midwest, and the East Coast from time to time.
    

Channel Title : ptazzy

Views : 6

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Published Date : 2018-01-27T23:33:53.000Z

Manny Mora Sanborn Chevrolet IT number 209-334-5000 www.sanbornchevrolet.com
    

Channel Title : DetroitImprovFest

Views : 67

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Published Date : 2014-02-14T00:54:56.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 433816

Likes : 3119

DisLikes : 72

Published Date : 2013-11-06T15:31:44.000Z

The Silhouettes were formed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1956, at first using the name The Thunderbirds. Their classic hit "Get A Job" - originally the B-side to "I Am Lonely" - was issued by their manager Kae Williams on his own Junior Records label before being sold to the nationally distributed Ember label in late 1957. It reached number 1 on both the R&B and pop charts in U.S. and the group performed it on television's American Bandstand. The song sold more than one million copies, and was awarded a gold record. The lyrics of "Get a Job" are notable for the depiction of a household in tension because of unemployment, despite the man's desperate attempts to find work, all delivered in a relentlessly upbeat style. A second release, "Heading for the Poorhouse", continued the economic theme. It was one of the few songs to allude to inflation, the trip to the poorhouse being because "all our money turned brown". This single and all their subsequent singles sold poorly and the group never entered the national charts again, making them a classic example of "one hit wonders". The Silhouettes toured with Sam Cooke, Jackie Wilson, Clyde McPhatter and others but the group never reached the top of the charts again. They disbanded in 1968, but the four original members reformed the group in the 1980s and continued to work until 1993. "Get a Job" is one of the best known doo-wop songs of the 1950s. Recorded by The Silhouettes in October 1957, the song reached the number one spot on the Billboard pop and R&B singles charts in February 1958. "When I was in the service in the early 1950s and didn't come home and go to work, my mother said 'get a job' and basically that's where the song came from," said tenor Richard Lewis, who wrote the lyrics. The four members shared the credit, jointly creating the "sha na na" and "dip dip dip dip" hooks later imitated by other doo-wop groups. The song was recorded at Robinson Recording Laboratories in Philadelphia in October 1957. Rollie McGill played the saxophone break and the arranger was Howard Biggs. It was released on the Junior label and Doug Moody who later formed Punk/Thrash label Mystic Records brought it to Ember Records where it was licensed for national distribution. Moody then worked with Dick Clark to get the group on American Bandstand. The Silhouettes performed the song several times on Dick Clark's American Bandstand in early 1958, the single sold more than a million copies. The song was later featured in the soundtracks of the movies American Graffiti, Stand By Me, the end credits for Trading Places and Joey (in which the group also performed it). The revival group Sha Na Na derived their name from the song's catchy doo-wop introduction. "Get a Job" inspired a number of answer songs, including "Got a Job", the debut recording by The Miracles. In 1999, this song was parodied in a Car Body Shop commercial, prior to that the UK recruitment agency, Brook Street Bureau, used the song in their two TV commercials although they replaced "get a job" with "better job". The Brook Street commercial was devised by Saatchi and Saatchi Garland Compton and cost over £1m in 1985 It was also covered by Neil Young & Crazy Horse on their 2012 album Americana.
    

Channel Title : Immusic2010

Views : 311

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Published Date : 2010-01-22T03:07:16.000Z

Acapella version of El Amor by Manny Mora ( Tito el bambino )
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 13452

Likes : 93

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-06-24T12:20:15.000Z

WMCA, New York - B. Mitchell Reed Cruisin' was an American Rock-and-Roll and pop music sampler series covering the years 1955-1970 released by Increase Records, originally in the early 1980's on vinyl, and in 1993 on CD and audio cassette. The covers were stylized after the works of pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. The series was special in that each album purported to be an authentic roughly 40-minutes recording of a contemporary radio station from that year, complete with contemporary ads, station jingles, and a radio DJ from that era introducing each song, reading out local news, and inviting the listeners to join in competitions.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 215304

Likes : 1372

DisLikes : 60

Published Date : 2013-11-02T10:56:57.000Z

The Channels were an American doo wop group from New York City. The Channels formed in 1955 around the singers Larry Hampden, Billy Morris, and Edward Doulphin; they started as a quintet with two additional part-time members, but soon after they permanently added Earl Michael Lewis and Clifton Wright, formerly of The Lotharios. Lewis was the group's main songwriter, writing (among others) their regional hit "The Closer You Are" (1956). The Channels recorded for record labels Gone, Fury, Port, Hit, Enjoy, and Groove. The lineup changed several times over the course of the band's lifetime. They enjoyed significant regional success on the East Coast but never charted a major nationwide hit. Frank Zappa covered "The Closer You Are" on his album Them or Us (1984).
    

Channel Title : MrMannyiscool1

Views : 35

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Published Date : 2013-06-11T01:15:03.000Z

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 14912

Likes : 207

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-11-05T04:14:36.000Z

The Solitaires are an American doo wop group, best remembered for their 1957 hit single, "Walking Along". Formed in Harlem in 1953, the band consisted of Herman Curtis, Buzzy Willis and Pat Gaston (who had previously been together in another group, The Crows), and Monte Owens, Bobby Baylor and Bobby Williams (formerly of The Mello-Moods). They were signed to the Old Town record label, from which they issued a series of singles. These included "Wonder Why", "Blue Valentine", and a cover version of the jazz standard, "I Don't Stand a Ghost of a Chance with You", all released in 1954. When Curtis (who was lead singer) left the group in 1955, he was replaced by Milton Love (formerly of the Concords), and it was with Love that the Solitaires enjoyed their greatest success. A string of hits throughout the latter part of the 1950s included "The Wedding" (1955), "The Angels Sang" (1956), and "Walking Along" (1957), which was later recorded by The Diamonds. The group released their final single in 1961, before disbanding. Various Solitaires line-ups have toured since 1961, and continue to do so to the present day. Currently, the group is made up of Milton Love, Freddy Barksdale, George Magnezid and Robbie Mansfield. Monte Owens died on March 3, 2011 in Bronx, New York, after a long illness, at the age of 74.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 13027

Likes : 95

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2014-06-24T01:17:23.000Z

KGFJ, Los Angeles - Hunter Hancock Cruisin' was an American Rock-and-Roll and pop music sampler series covering the years 1955-1970 released by Increase Records, originally in the early 1980's on vinyl, and in 1993 on CD and audio cassette. The covers were stylized after the works of pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. The series was special in that each album purported to be an authentic roughly 40-minutes recording of a contemporary radio station from that year, complete with contemporary ads, station jingles, and a radio DJ from that era introducing each song, reading out local news, and inviting the listeners to join in competitions.
    

Channel Title : wilsonsphoto

Views : 78

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Published Date : 2013-03-08T04:07:29.000Z

Manny Mora PUC Talent Show 2013
    

Channel Title : DetroitImprovFest

Views : 19

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Published Date : 2014-04-05T17:13:38.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 7913

Likes : 51

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-07T07:21:16.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition
    

Channel Title : vishome0910

Views : 114

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Published Date : 2013-02-21T04:58:16.000Z

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Channel Title : OpenMic Crew

Views : 30

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Published Date : 2013-09-11T01:27:31.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 424587

Likes : 3583

DisLikes : 78

Published Date : 2013-11-15T09:23:52.000Z

The Marcels were an American doo-wop group known for turning popular music songs into rock and roll. The group formed in 1959 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and signed to Colpix Records, with lead Cornelius Harp, bass Fred Johnson, Gene Bricker, Ron Mundy, and Richard Knauss. The group was named after a popular hair style of the day, the marcel wave, by Fred Johnson's younger sister Priscilla. In 1961 many were surprised to hear a new version of the ballad "Blue Moon", that began with the bass singer saying, "bomp-baba-bomp" and "dip-da-dip." The record sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. It is featured in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. The disc went to number one in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and UK Singles Chart.[5] In the U.S., additional revivals in the same vein as "Blue Moon" -- "Heartaches" and "Melancholy Baby" -- were less successful, although "Heartaches" peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 and eventually sold over one million copies worldwide. In August 1961, due to problems encountered in the Deep South while touring because of the group being bi-racial, the white members, Knauss and Bricker left and were replaced by Allen Johnson (brother of Fred) and Walt Maddox. Mundy left soon after, leaving the group a quartet. In 1962, Harp and Allen Johnson left, and were replaced by Richard Harris and William Herndon. There was a brief reunion of the original members in 1973. The group made several recordings in 1975 with Harp back on lead. Original member Gene Bricker died in 1983. Allen Johnson died in 1995. By the early 1990s the group included Johnson, Maddox, Harris, Jules Hopson, and Richard Merritt. The group split around 1995. Fred Johnson formed his own group with new members, while the other four members recruited new bassist Ted Smith. Maddox won a lawsuit against Sunny James Svetnic, the manager of Johnson's group, for trademark infringement in 1996. Johnson reunited with Harp, Mundy, and Knauss in 1999 for the PBS special Doo Wop 50. The Marcels were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2002. In Brazil, their greatest hit, "Blue Moon", was the opening theme from the soap opera production O Beijo do Vampiro, from TV Globo network, exhibited between 2002 and 2003. Their original lead singer, Cornelius Harp, died in 2013.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 105510

Likes : 216

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Published Date : 2013-04-24T11:56:27.000Z

''Flowing Rivers'' is the first album by pop singer Andy Gibb. It was released in 1977. Although the album is not currently in print, it was released to iTunes along with the other two Andy Gibb albums in 2011. The first Andy Gibb album was finally issued almost a year after it was recorded, carefully spaced between the Bee Gees releases. Andy wrote eight of the ten songs and Barry contributed for two. Andy was very suddenly very big in America, where both of the singles hit number 1. Unfortunately the ill effects of what Barry calls first fame had already claimed him by now. Andy recorded an album of songs at Criteria around October 1976. He came to Miami in September and the sessions at Criteria are known to have coincided with the Eagles recording Hotel California, which they completed in October. Eagles member Joe Walsh plays on two tracks and Andy said that listening to some of the Eagles' songs influenced the sound he wanted on his album. The sessions were produced by Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson, and with Barry on two songs, Albhy chose the experienced musicians who play on the album. The core group was Joey Murcia and Tim Renwick on guitar, Paul Harris and Albhy himself on piano and keyboards and Harold Cowart and Ron Ziegler on bass and drums. For some songs, they were joined by other top session players. Barry was very impressed with the polished sound of the session players. Barry was present to record only two songs ("I Just Want to Be Your Everything" and "(Love Is) Thicker Than Water") the two that he wrote for Andy, and although Andy said it was almost entirely Barry's work, it does sound a little closer to Andy's style.
    

Channel Title : OpenMic Crew

Views : 32

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Published Date : 2013-09-11T01:40:42.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 37744

Likes : 401

DisLikes : 18

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:47:40.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : vishome0910

Views : 33

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Published Date : 2013-03-23T22:04:22.000Z

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Channel Title : francisco torres

Views : 248

Likes : 1

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Published Date : 2016-10-04T17:44:08.000Z

Manny mora campeon
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 27195

Likes : 216

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2013-11-01T10:30:43.000Z

With their elegant, intricate and flawless vocal arrangements, the Flamingos are widely regarded as one of the best vocal groups in music history. The graceful vocals and sharp choreography of Motown's biggest stars -- the Temptations, the Supremes, the Jackson 5 and the Miracles among them -- owe a debt to the Flamingos, as do such paragons of Philadelphia soul as the Spinners, and Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes. Although many of the Flamingos' recordings did not make the pop charts or even get heard beyond a regional fan base, they have with hindsight acquired a reputation as vocal-group classics. In particular, their third single, "Golden Teardrops," has been hailed as "the most perfect-sounding single of all time" and "a legendary masterpiece." Yet it failed to reach the national pop charts upon its initial release in 1953, and a reissue eight years later stalled at Number 108. Still, the Flamingos put 11 singles on the pop chart and nine singles on the R&B chart between 1956 and 1970. Two of those singles made the Top 10: "I'll Be Home" (Number Five R&B) and "I Only Have Eyes For You" (Number Three R&B and Number 11 pop). The Flamingos formed in 1952 in Chicago, where they sang in a church choir. Somewhat uniquely, the congregation to which founding members Jake Carey, Zeke Carey, Paul Wilson and Johnnie Carter belonged was the black Jewish Church of God and Saints of Christ. Having mastered the minor-key melodies of Jewish hymns, they retained this influence when they began singing pop and R&B. Initially known as the Swallows, then the Five Flamingos, and eventually just the Flamingos, they became a quintet with the addition of Earl Lewis. They signed to the Chicago-based Chance label in 1953. By then, they had a new lead vocalist, Sollie McElroy, who was discovered at a talent show. They recorded in a variety of styles, including midtempo ballads ("Someday, Someway"), lowdown blues ("Blues in a Letter"), pop standards ("That's My Desire") and jump tunes ("Jump Children"). From Chance, they moved to Parrot, where they recorded a handful of singles, including the ballad "Dream of a Lifetime" and the uptempo "Ko Ko Mo," and acquired yet another lead singer, Nate Nelson. In 1955, they signed with Chess Records and released records on its Checker subsidiary. Their third 45 for Checker was "I'll Be Home," a dramatic ballad in which a serviceman promises a loved one that he'll return. It became their first R&B smash and would've no doubt been a big mainstream hit, too, had Pat Boone not rushed out a pallid cover version. Deejay Alan Freed thought highly enough of the Flamingos to include them in two of his late-Fifties rock and roll flicks: Rock, Rock, Rock (in which they performed "Would I Be Crying") and Go Johnny Go! ("Jump Children"). In 1958, the group moved to George Goldner's End Records, and they moved from Chicago to New York City as well. Their lineup now consisted of Zeke and Jake Carey, Paul Wilson, Nate Nelson, new singer Tommy Hunt and guitarist/singer Terry Johnson, the Flamingos cut some of their most enduring sides for End, including the exquisite "Lovers Never Say Goodbye" and their satiny signature song, "I Only Have Eyes for You" (Number Three R&B, Number 11 pop). The latter, originally a 1934 hit for Ben Selvin, is one of the most sublime and enduring vocal-group recordings of all time. While at End, the Flamingos released four albums, including Flamingo Serenade, a masterful album of pop standards by Cole Porter, George Gershwin and others. Although the Flamingos' popularity tailed off in the Sixties with the rise of the British Invasion bands, they continued recording and performing down the decades. After the deaths of cousins Jake and Zeke Carey, Terry Johnson continued to lead and perform with a new line-up of the Flamingos.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4039

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Published Date : 2014-07-09T10:08:26.000Z

Eugene Dixon, 6 July 1937, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Recalled for the gauche but irresistible 1962 US number 1, 'Duke Of Earl', Chandler's million-selling single in fact featured the Dukays, a doo-wop quintet he fronted (Eugene Dixon, Shirley Jones, James Lowe, Earl Edwards and Ben Broyles). His record company preferred to promote a solo artist and thus one of soul's most enduring careers was launched. Temporarily bedevilled by his 'dandy' image, the singer was rescued by a series of excellent Curtis Mayfield -penned songs, including 'Rainbow' and 'Man's Temptation'. These were hits in 1963, but the relationship blossomed with 'Just Be True' (1964) and the sublime 'Nothing Can Stop Me' (1965), both US Top 20 singles. Chandler later recorded under the aegis of producer Carl Davis, including '(The) Girl Don't Care', 'There Goes The Lover' and 'From The Teacher To The Preacher', a duet with Barbara Acklin. Switching to Mercury Records in 1970, 'Groovy Situation' became another major hit, while an inspired teaming with Jerry Butler was an artistic triumph. Chandler's career was revitalized during the disco boom when 'Get Down' was an international hit on Chi-Sound (Chandler was also a vice-president for the label). Further releases, 'When You're Number 1' and 'Does She Have A Friend', consolidated such success, while recordings for Salsoul, with Jaime Lynn and Fastfire, continued his career into the 80s.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 63879

Likes : 626

DisLikes : 15

Published Date : 2014-02-10T19:06:51.000Z

This US R&B vocal group helped shape the rhythm and blues revolution of the early 50s. The ensemble was formed as the Sentimental Four in Newport News, Virginia, USA, in 1945, and originally comprised two sets of brothers - Rudy West (25 July 1932, Newport News, Virginia, USA, d. 14 May 1998, USA; first tenor) and Bernie West (b. 4 February 1930, Newport News, Virginia, USA; bass), and Ripley Ingram (b. 1929, d. 23 March 1995, Newport News, Virginia, USA; octave tenor) and Raphael Ingram (second tenor). After Raphael Ingram left and Edwin Hall (baritone) and James 'Dickie' Smith (b. 1933, USA; second tenor) became members in 1949, the name of the group was changed to Five Keys. At the start of the following year the newly married Hall departed and was replaced by Maryland Pierce, and guitarist Joe Jones was also added to the touring line-up. With Pierce, Smith and Rudy West sharing lead, and Ripley Ingram providing the then unique 'floating tenor' element, the Five Keys joined Los Angeles-based Aladdin Records in 1951. With pianist Joe Jones (no relation to the previous guitarist) now providing accompaniment, the group enjoyed a hit the same year with a remake of the old standard 'The Glory Of Love', which became a US R&B number 1. Despite recording an appealing combination of old standards and R&B originals, further chart success on Aladdin eluded the Five Keys. In 1952 Rudy West went into the army, and was replaced by Ulysses K. Hicks, and in 1954 Dickie Smith left and was replaced by Ramon Loper. This new line-up of Five Keys was signed to Capitol Records, which brought the group to stardom, albeit with some modification in their style from a deep rhythm and blues sound to a more pop vein with greater instrumentation in support. The group's first hit for Capitol was the novelty pop jump 'Ling, Ting, Tong' (US R&B number 5 and pop Top 30 in 1955). Following the first Capitol recording session, Rudy West rejoined the Five Keys in October 1954, working alongside the ailing Hicks, who died of a heart attack a few months later. Further hits on Capitol included some spectacular R&B ballads: the Chuck Willis -composed 'Close Your Eyes' (R&B number 5, 1955), 'The Verdict' (R&B number 13, 1955) and 'Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind' (R&B number 12 and pop Top 30 in 1956). The Capitol material also featured old standards, such as a marvellous remake of the Ink Spots' 'The Gypsy' (1957). Rudy West and Ramon Loper retired in 1958 and were replaced by Thomas 'Dickie' Threatt (b. 7 February 1938, USA, d. 9 October 2007, Norfolk, Virginia, USA; tenor) and Charles 'Bobby' Crawley (second tenor). An unsuccessful period at King Records from 1958-61 produced more personnel changes and no hits, and few songs that could compete with the new rock 'n' roll sounds. Periodic sessions were recorded by various reunion groups in subsequent years, but the basic legacy of the Five Keys rests in their Aladdin, Capitol and King sessions.
    

Channel Title : OpenMic Crew

Views : 19

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Published Date : 2013-08-13T00:48:10.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 131539

Likes : 1076

DisLikes : 14

Published Date : 2013-11-02T10:25:46.000Z

The Five Satins are an American doo-wop group, best known for their 1956 million-selling song, "In the Still of the Night". The group, formed in New Haven, Connecticut, consisted of leader Fred Parris, Lou Peebles, Stanley Dortch, Ed Martin and Jim Freeman and Nat Mosley in 1954. With little success, the group reorganized, with Dortch and Peebles leaving, and new member Al Denby entering. The group then recorded "In the Still of the Night", a very big hit in the United States which was originally released as the B-side to the single, "The Jones Girl". The single was initially issued on the tiny local "Standord" label and after some local Connecticut sales, it was released the following year on the New York label "Ember", and "In the Still of the Night" ended up charting at number three on the R&B chart and number 25 on the pop charts. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.[1] Parris entered the Army soon after, and the group reorganized again, with Martin, Freeman, Tommy Killebrew, Jessie Murphy and new lead Bill Baker. This lineup hit with another highly successful song, Billy Dawn Smith's "To the Aisle". Upon Parris' return from the Army, a new lineup was assembled, consisting of Parris, Lou Peebles (who was in a previous incarnation of the Five Satins), Sylvester Hopkins, Richie Freeman and Wes Forbes. The group would be briefly known as "Fred Parris and the Scarlets", until the Baker-led group split up. At this point, they reverted to the Five Satins name, but had little success on the charts. By the early 1970s the group was Parris, Peebles, Richie Freeman, Jimmy Curtis and Corky Rogers, and they continued recording into the 1980s, with Parris, Richie Freeman, Curtis and Nate Marshall. Meanwhile, Bill Baker started his own Five Satins group in 1981, with former Satin Sylvester Hopkins and Hopkins' brothers Arthur "Count" Hopkins, Sr. and Frank. By the late 1980s, this group consisted of Baker, Harvey Potts, Jr., Anthony Hofler and Octavio DeLeon. In 1990, the group was joined by Jimmie Wilson stepping into the first tenor position for Don Simpson. Fred Parris and Richie Freeman continue to perform. Bill Baker died in 1994 One of the original members of the Five Satins now works in the cafeteria at the University of New Haven. Jim Freeman lives in Norwalk, Iowa and owns a pest control company. Wes Forbes is a psychologist in the State of California, currently employed with Alliant International University as a Training Director. Richie Freeman is the house sound engineer at NY's famed Iridium jazz club. Fred Parris and Richie Freeman are still actively performing occasionally with the Five Satins. The lineup now also includes Eugene Dobbs, originally the lead singer and founder of Nu-Cullers[3] and Nadina Perry. They are supported by musicians Pat Marafiote (keyboards and MD), Greg Borino (guitar), Jerry Langley (bass) and James Moore (drums). The group performs regularly throughout the Northeast and they continue to actively record new material.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 12645

Likes : 103

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-03T15:56:34.000Z

With neither Ruffin brother experiencing significant success in the wake of their non-simultaneous departure from the Temptations, Jimmy latched upon the idea of recording a duet album with the younger David -- partially as a way to pay tribute to their recently passed parents, partially as a way to jump-start their stalled careers. In regards to the latter, 1970's I Am My Brother's Keeper was no great shakes, barely scraping the pop charts and its lead single "Stand by Me" only reaching 24 on the R&B charts, but as a testament to the familial talents of the Ruffins, the LP succeeds, proving that these two great voices could enliven familiar tunes. It's a knack that's needed here, for much of I Am My Brother's Keeper consists of splashy, sequin-studded and polyester-draped covers of pop and R&B hits. Just under half of the album consists of versions of tunes by the Hollies, Ben E. King, the Delfonics and Tyrone Davis, with the rest of the record coming from in-house Motown writers and elsewhere, including the rousing Gloria Jones co-write "When My Love Hand Comes Down." This is one of five Bobby Taylor productions on the LP, and he gives the Ruffins soulful, funky sounds that showcase them at their best, with Henry Cosby, Duke Browner, Frank Wilson and Al Kent responsible for the songs that edge a little closer to the pop charts. Combined, all the producers provide a sampler of Motown sounds at the dawn of the '70s -- sometimes things are deeply funky, sometimes things are slick enough for a televised variety revue -- but the Ruffins pull it all together, sounding comfortable in every setting, always commanding attention. Perhaps its underwhelming commercial performance is understandable -- there are no true knockouts here, just a bunch of strong soul -- but I Am My Brother's Keeper is an album that seems stronger in retrospect, as it was the last time one of the great brother teams in soul sung together so joyfully. [Hip-O Select's 2010 reissue adds the excellent unreleased "You're What I Need (Not What I Want)" -- produced by Bobby Taylor and co-written by Gloria Jones and Pamela Sawyer -- and a mix of "Stand by Me" that removes the fake live overdubs of the original.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 62700

Likes : 555

DisLikes : 7

Published Date : 2013-11-06T10:06:46.000Z

The Shells were an American doo wop ensemble formed in Brooklyn in 1956. The group scored a US pop hit in 1957 with the song "Baby Oh Baby", released on Johnson Records; the song cracked the Top 30. Further singles passed with little success until 1960, when producers Donn Fileti and Wayne Stierle re-issued "Baby Oh Baby"; the tune hit #21 on the US Billboard Hot 100 upon rerelease.The group issued several further singles, as well as a split LP with The Dubs in 1963.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 25027

Likes : 313

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-11-10T07:46:00.000Z

The Fiestas were an American Rhythm and Blues musical group from Newark, New Jersey. Organized in 1958, The Fiestas contracted with Old Town Records company in 1959 after the company's owner, Hy Weiss, overheard the group singing in a bathroom adjacent to his office in Harlem. Their debut single was 1959's "So Fine", written by Johnny Otis; the song was a hit in the U.S., reaching #3 on the Black Singles chart and #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 with a hidden gem, "Last Night I Deamed", on the flip side. A series of soul singles followed from the group, among them "You Could Be My Girlfriend", "Anna", and "Think Smart", but only 1962's "Broken Heart" managed to chart, scoring #18 on the Black Singles chart. Ending their relationship with Old Town, the group later recorded for the Strand and Vigor labels, releasing music into the mid-1970s. Members[edit]
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6940

Likes : 45

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-03T15:32:14.000Z

With neither Ruffin brother experiencing significant success in the wake of their non-simultaneous departure from the Temptations, Jimmy latched upon the idea of recording a duet album with the younger David -- partially as a way to pay tribute to their recently passed parents, partially as a way to jump-start their stalled careers. In regards to the latter, 1970's I Am My Brother's Keeper was no great shakes, barely scraping the pop charts and its lead single "Stand by Me" only reaching 24 on the R&B charts, but as a testament to the familial talents of the Ruffins, the LP succeeds, proving that these two great voices could enliven familiar tunes. It's a knack that's needed here, for much of I Am My Brother's Keeper consists of splashy, sequin-studded and polyester-draped covers of pop and R&B hits. Just under half of the album consists of versions of tunes by the Hollies, Ben E. King, the Delfonics and Tyrone Davis, with the rest of the record coming from in-house Motown writers and elsewhere, including the rousing Gloria Jones co-write "When My Love Hand Comes Down." This is one of five Bobby Taylor productions on the LP, and he gives the Ruffins soulful, funky sounds that showcase them at their best, with Henry Cosby, Duke Browner, Frank Wilson and Al Kent responsible for the songs that edge a little closer to the pop charts. Combined, all the producers provide a sampler of Motown sounds at the dawn of the '70s -- sometimes things are deeply funky, sometimes things are slick enough for a televised variety revue -- but the Ruffins pull it all together, sounding comfortable in every setting, always commanding attention. Perhaps its underwhelming commercial performance is understandable -- there are no true knockouts here, just a bunch of strong soul -- but I Am My Brother's Keeper is an album that seems stronger in retrospect, as it was the last time one of the great brother teams in soul sung together so joyfully. [Hip-O Select's 2010 reissue adds the excellent unreleased "You're What I Need (Not What I Want)" -- produced by Bobby Taylor and co-written by Gloria Jones and Pamela Sawyer -- and a mix of "Stand by Me" that removes the fake live overdubs of the original.]
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6433

Likes : 50

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2015-10-08T03:55:37.000Z

''One to One'' is the third album by British pop musician Howard Jones, released in October 1986. The CD release also contains the single version of "No One Is to Blame" (a song featured on his previous album) with Phil Collins on backing vocals and drums. The album contained the hits "You Know I Love You...Don't You?" (US top twenty) and "All I Want" (top 40 in many European countries). The album went gold in a number of European territories including the UK and Ireland.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 347

Likes : 2

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Published Date : 2015-10-18T07:35:01.000Z

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 42237

Likes : 291

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2014-07-18T13:44:19.000Z

"There Goes My Baby" is a song written by Ben E. King (Benjamin Nelson), Lover Patterson, George Treadwell, Jerry Leiber, and Mike Stoller, and produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller for The Drifters. This was the first single by the second incarnation of the Drifters (previously known as the 5 Crowns), who assumed the group name in 1958 after manager George Treadwell fired the remaining members of the original lineup. Leiber and Stoller used a radically different approach to production than Ahmet Ertegun and Jerry Wexler had employed with the original Clyde McPhatter-led Drifters. The combination of new style and new group fit, and the song reached number two on the Hot 100 and number one on the Billboard R&B chart and on the Cash Box sales chart for two weeks, in the summer of 1959. The Atlantic Records release was King's debut recording as lead singer of the group. The personnel on the original recording included Mike Stoller on piano, King Curtis on sax, Wendell Marshall on bass, and Sticks Evans on drums & tympani. The song was included in the musical revue "Smokey Joe's Cafe".

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