David Ruffin Statue Of A Fool 1975....!

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 748686

Likes : 6601

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Published Date : 2013-05-06T15:21:11.000Z

''Who I Am'' (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : ruffan

Views : 133296

Likes : 1141

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Published Date : 2008-08-01T07:56:37.000Z

A beautiful song from his 1975 album "Who I Am"...a classic
    

Channel Title : DocRewdySoul

Views : 736313

Likes : 5168

DisLikes : 263

Published Date : 2011-12-11T07:47:18.000Z

The genius of David Ruffin ... written when he was 18 years old !
    

Channel Title : Glory To YaH

Views : 474

Likes : 6

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Published Date : 2017-09-21T08:02:52.000Z

Album : Who I Am , 1975
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 32265

Likes : 280

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Published Date : 2013-05-06T15:15:35.000Z

''Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 30126

Likes : 295

DisLikes : 14

Published Date : 2013-05-06T14:43:33.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : Barry Fowden

Views : 882294

Likes : 2485

DisLikes : 90

Published Date : 2007-01-07T12:09:05.000Z

A legend..unmissable
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 7176

Likes : 147

DisLikes : 14

Published Date : 2014-12-25T20:26:11.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Statue Of A Fool · David Ruffin The Ultimate Collection: David Ruffin ℗ 1975 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1998-01-01 Recording Arranger, Producer: Van McCoy Author, Composer: Jan Crutchfield Author, Composer: David Ruffin Music Publisher: Sure-Fire Music Inc. Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : TopHits

Views : 1031603

Likes : 9614

DisLikes : 927

Published Date : 2015-04-05T04:00:56.000Z

David Ruffin: Best Songs Of David Ruffin - David Ruffin's Greatest Hits Full Album - Những ca khúc hay nhất của David Ruffin 1. Walk away from love 2. My whole world ended 3. Statue of a fool 4. Rainy night in Georgia 5. Can we make love one more time 6. I miss you 7. Common man 8. I wanna be with you 9. Slow dance 10. Still in love with you 11. Stand by me 12. The things we have to do 13. True love can be beautiful 14. Who I am 15. Heavy love 16. I want you back 17. Still in my heart 18. Hurt the one you love 19. I can't be hurt anymore 20. Let somebody love me 21. Mountain of memories 22. All I need 23. Love supply 24. Don't you go home 25. I saw you when you met her
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 15602

Likes : 355

DisLikes : 77

Published Date : 2015-03-26T12:34:11.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Statue Of A Fool · David Ruffin The Temptations / One By One / The Best Of Their Solo Years ℗ 1975 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1996-01-01 Recording Arranger, Producer: Van McCoy Author, Composer: Jan Crutchfield Author, Composer: David Ruffin Music Publisher: Sure-Fire Music Inc. Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Warren Burns

Views : 8328

Likes : 81

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2014-05-29T14:18:54.000Z

David Ruffin - Statue Of A Fool (Video Life Story) HD
    

Channel Title : Sharri Plaza

Views : 9615

Likes : 59

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2012-06-15T13:58:57.000Z

-~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Journey Into Ancient Egyptian Meditation Music" ➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-b3SSbJ5QQ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
    

Channel Title : sholondia

Views : 175751

Likes : 1038

DisLikes : 17

Published Date : 2009-01-16T17:11:13.000Z

now aint that sexy wow!
    

Channel Title : JHOW RICHARD

Views : 28747

Likes : 281

DisLikes : 17

Published Date : 2013-10-16T21:38:59.000Z

    

Channel Title : Cla Sessantasette

Views : 6042

Likes : 62

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-08-30T17:34:48.000Z

DAVID RUFFIN - Statue Of a Fool (1975) - From the album "Who I am" - Produced arranged and conducted by Van McCoy - by 67aFroSoUL ✿
    

Channel Title : John G Byrne

Views : 3030

Likes : 30

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-02-11T00:35:35.000Z

MotownMagic1959 This beautiful tune is probably one of my most favorite songs on Motown. David Ruffin wrote this unreleased at the time lovely song, and if you saw the film "The Temptations" you'll know he had a tragic end to life! this reflects that in the music I think, it was a very personal song. Hope you will like this ballad, it's certainly Motown at it's best. This was produced by the great Van McCoy who also died 4 years later sadly. JOHN
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4274

Likes : 26

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-22T03:06:14.000Z

Formerly known as "Little David Bush" After moving to Detroit with the Bushes, Ruffin recorded his first released records with the songs "You and I" (1958) b/w "Believe Me" (1958) and the original version of "Statue of a Fool." These songs were recorded at Vega Records and released under the name "Little David Bush", using the last name of the man he was living with at the time, Eddie Bush. Ruffin would later recall how he initially recorded "a different kind of music", strongly influenced by the smoother pop and R&B of the time, when he first recorded in Detroit for Vega.[6] In 1957, Ruffin met Berry Gordy, Jr., then a songwriter with ambitions of running his own label. Ruffin lived with Gordy's father, a contractor, and helped "Pops" Gordy do construction work on the building that would become Hitsville USA, the headquarters for Gordy's Tamla Records (later Motown Records) label.Ruffin's brother Jimmy would eventually be signed to Tamla's Miracle Records label as an artist. Ruffin also worked alongside another ambitious singer, Marvin Gaye, as an apprentice at Anna Records, a Chess-distributed label run by Gordy's sister Gwen Gordy Fuqua and his songwriting partner Billy Davis. Asked about Ruffin in the Detroit Free Press in 1988, Gordy Fuqua said, "He was very much a gentleman, yes ma'am and no ma'am, but the thing that really impressed me about David was that he was one of the only artists I've seen who rehearsed like he was on stage."
    

Channel Title : Stephen A. Banks

Views : 14023

Likes : 91

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2010-07-28T22:15:01.000Z

In his 1975 album "Who I Am" , David Ruffin sings a wonderful ballad produced and arranged by the late Van McCoy entitled "Statue Of A Fool". ABOUT THE SONG: THe song "Statue Of A Fool" was originally recorded in 1969 by country singer Jack Greene. The writer was Jan Crutchfield. It went to #1 on the country charts. (Source: Wikipedia). However, the album credits David Ruffin as the author of this song. While he may have done a wonderful job in singing this song, the proper credit must be given to Jan Crutchfield as the author of this song.THE RECORD: Released in 1975 as Motown M6-849S1. It was produced by Van McCoy.
    

Channel Title : chillin616

Views : 171

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-01-19T18:22:47.000Z

This sure is a GEM..!!! David Ruffin had an extraordinary voice... R.I.P. David.! Enjoy💕
    

Channel Title : pieroangelo2

Views : 442

Likes : 16

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2018-02-14T17:44:57.000Z

1975
    

Channel Title : raymondbarber1001

Views : 37579

Likes : 95

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Published Date : 2009-09-04T12:57:49.000Z

    

Channel Title : Antonio Lopez

Views : 2972

Likes : 20

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2012-12-24T19:05:50.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 13358

Likes : 78

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-06T15:06:25.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : funkpunkandroll

Views : 372

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-06-24T00:03:12.000Z

"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 16837

Likes : 114

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2013-05-07T00:43:24.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6716

Likes : 60

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-23T03:53:51.000Z

After moving to Detroit with the Bushes, Ruffin recorded his first released records with the songs "You and I" (1958) b/w "Believe Me" (1958) and the original version of "Statue of a Fool." These songs were recorded at Vega Records and released under the name "Little David Bush", using the last name of the man he was living with at the time, Eddie Bush. Ruffin would later recall how he initially recorded "a different kind of music", strongly influenced by the smoother pop and R&B of the time, when he first recorded in Detroit for Vega. In 1957, Ruffin met Berry Gordy, Jr., then a songwriter with ambitions of running his own label. Ruffin lived with Gordy's father, a contractor, and helped "Pops" Gordy do construction work on the building that would become Hitsville USA, the headquarters for Gordy's Tamla Records (later Motown Records) label.Ruffin's brother Jimmy would eventually be signed to Tamla's Miracle Records label as an artist. Ruffin also worked alongside another ambitious singer, Marvin Gaye, as an apprentice at Anna Records, a Chess-distributed label run by Gordy's sister Gwen Gordy Fuqua and his songwriting partner Billy Davis. Asked about Ruffin in the Detroit Free Press in 1988, Gordy Fuqua said, "He was very much a gentleman, yes ma'am and no ma'am, but the thing that really impressed me about David was that he was one of the only artists I've seen who rehearsed like he was on stage." Eventually, Ruffin started recording at Anna Records, and recorded the song "I'm in Love" b/w "One of These Days" (1961), with the Voice Masters, which included future Motown producer Lamont Dozier and members of the singing group the Originals Ty Hunter, C.P. Spencer, Hank Dixon and Voice Masters and The Originals founder Walter Gaines (and, at one time, it also had another future Temptations member, Melvin Franklin, one of numerous people David would claim as a cousin).
    

Channel Title : When The Cowboy Sings

Views : 1352

Likes : 37

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2018-04-03T16:44:10.000Z

Jack Greene Statue Of A Fool live on That Nashville Music "Statue of a Fool" is a song, whose authorship is surrounded in controversy. According to Genna Sapia-Ruffin, the mother of David Ruffin, former member of The Temptations' son, on page 251 of her book A Memoir: Davod Ruffin -- My Temptation (1993-2003, 1st Books Library), David Ruffin wrote and originally released the song on a 78 RPM in 1958, when he was recording under the name "Little Eddie Bush.' However, as he was only seventeen years old at that time, later covers of the song gave writing credits to Jan Crutchfield. It was recorded by a number of country artists. In 1969, it was recorded by country music artist Jack Greene, released as a single and became a number 1 hit. Brian Collins recorded and released it in 1974 from his second album, This Is Brian Collins. It peaked at number 10 on the country charts. David Ruffin, formerly of The Temptations, rerecorded the song in 1975, with his name unchallenged as the sole writer. Bill Medley, formerly of The Righteous Brothers, also released a rendition in 1979 that went to number 91 on the same chart. In 1989, it was recorded by country music artist Ricky Van Shelton, who released it as a single from the album, RVS III. It peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart and hit #1 on the Canadian RPM country singles chart https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statue_of_a_Fool Jack Greene Statue Of A Fool lyrics Somewhere there should be for all the world to see A statue of a fool made of stone An image of a man who let love slip through his hands And then just let him stand there all alone And there on his face a gold tear should be placed To honor the million tears he's cried And the hurt in his eyes would show so everyone would know Concealed is a broken heart inside So build a statue and oh build it high So that all can see Then inscribe the world's greatest fool And name it after me When The Cowboy Sings facebook https://www.facebook.com/WesternSwing2000/ When The Cowboy Sings website http://whenthecowboysings.com/ KWC Americana Radio Station http://kwcamericanars.com/
    

Channel Title : chicanoII

Views : 443

Likes : 5

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Published Date : 2014-11-01T05:35:16.000Z

Description
    

Channel Title : Carol's Oldies/Soul

Views : 1025

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Published Date : 2015-11-19T02:57:06.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 14604

Likes : 103

DisLikes : 7

Published Date : 2013-05-06T15:10:44.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : R.F. Burns

Views : 97

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-08-06T18:17:12.000Z

Transferred from a 1975 Motown recording
    

Channel Title : John Strong

Views : 570

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2015-08-11T18:10:05.000Z

Nice Song
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 28469

Likes : 197

DisLikes : 13

Published Date : 2013-05-07T00:13:44.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : TheBobbyxxcruz

Views : 5026

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 5

Published Date : 2012-09-19T17:59:54.000Z

    

Channel Title : Various Artists - Topic

Views : 1470

Likes : 8

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2015-01-19T07:52:41.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Rebeat Digital GmbH Statue Of Fool - Karaoke Version (Originally recorded by Will Downing) · Fresh Karaoke Top Will Downing Songs Karaoke ℗ 2012 Fresh Karaoke Released on: 2012-11-22 Composer: RIDEOUT REX K Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Sharri Plaza

Views : 370

Likes : 13

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-04-30T16:33:37.000Z

    

Channel Title : Ashal008

Views : 783

Likes : 14

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-05-29T19:32:59.000Z

Old School Soul Chopped and Screwed
    

Channel Title : RightMind215

Views : 568

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-01-10T01:44:49.000Z

David Ruffin is one of the illest of all time. RightMind(215) on piano and vocals
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 31468

Likes : 231

DisLikes : 14

Published Date : 2013-05-07T01:59:25.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : Lee Anthony

Views : 7751

Likes : 74

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2017-06-14T09:16:28.000Z

This Day in Music History: (For more daily music histories, please subscribe to the LEE ANTHONY YouTube channel. Thank you!) On This Day In Music History, June 14, 1989, Ricky Van Shelton records "Statue Of A Fool" in Nashville. Ricky Van Shelton (born January 12, 1952) is a Country Music guitarist, singer and songwriter. Between 1986 and 2006, he charted over twenty singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, including ten Number-Ones: "Somebody Lied", "Life Turned Her That Way", 'Don't We All Have the Right", "I'll Leave This World Loving You", "From a Jack to a King" (a cover of the Ned Miller hit), "Living Proof", "I've Cried My Last Tear for You", "Rockin' Years" (a duet with Dolly Parton), "I Am a Simple Man", and "Keep It Between the Lines". He also scored seven additional Top-Tens. He has released nine studio albums, of which his first four have all been certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. "Statue of a Fool" is a song written by Jan Crutchfield and recorded by many country artists. It was first recorded in 1969 by country music artist Jack Greene where it was released as a single and became a number 1 hit. Brian Collins recorded and released it in 1974 from his second album, This Is Brian Collins. It peaked at number 10 on the country charts. David Ruffin, formerly of The Temptations, also recorded a version of the song in 1975. Bill Medley, formerly of The Righteous Brothers, also released a rendition in 1979 that went to number 91 on the same chart. In 1989, it was recorded by country music artist Ricky Van Shelton, who released it as a single from the album, RVS III. It peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart and hit Number-One on the Canadian RPM country singles chart. [Copyright Disclaimer. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.]
    

Channel Title : Barney USMC

Views : 180

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2017-04-05T05:37:17.000Z

There has been a dispute over Statue Of A Fool as to who actually wrote the song. Jack Greene went to court & won after he said that he and Jan Crutchfield, not David, wrote 'Statue' in the early 60s. David, on the other hand, said he wrote the song when he was 18, which means he wrote it in the late 50s. Now, I don't know who's telling the truth, but it's been alleged that David insisted that he wrote it. 'Statue' was a country song that was recorded in '68. David's version came out in '75. All I know is it's a great song in either genre!
    

Channel Title : bsr505

Views : 1930

Likes : 29

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-03-19T22:15:16.000Z

    

Channel Title : Taw Harris

Views : 4714

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-12-26T02:21:32.000Z

Winston "Taw" Harris covering "Statue Of A Fool". The original song was first recorded in 1969 by country music artist Jack Greene. David Ruffin, formerly of The Temptations, also recorded a version of the song in 1975.
    

Channel Title : Tru Soul

Views : 195

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2015-04-21T17:25:56.000Z

Me singing Ruffin
    

Channel Title : TheTracStar Wes-J

Views : 176

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-10-20T15:34:35.000Z

When I was a little kid I remember being in my room listening to (David Ruffin, Former lead singer for the AMAZING Temptations,) Sing this song over and over again ... It's almost as if I knew I'd be singing it also someday ... : - )

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