David Ruffin So Soon We Change 1979....!

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 509698

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Published Date : 2013-05-10T07:01:58.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 14682

Likes : 134

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Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:37:29.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group So Soon We Change · David Ruffin So Soon We Change ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: James Dean Writer: John Glover Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : gaynormartin

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Published Date : 2014-01-31T05:04:36.000Z

    

Channel Title : MultiplicityMe MusicalMoments

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Published Date : 2016-09-11T14:14:52.000Z

    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 19617

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Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:36:34.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Let Your Love Rain Down On Me · David Ruffin So Soon We Change ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. Performed by: David Ruffin Producer: Don Davis Writer: Charles McCollough Writer: Joe Shamwell Writer: Tommy Tate Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Antonio Lopez

Views : 15688

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Published Date : 2012-04-02T09:30:43.000Z

    

Channel Title : EVERSAW HARDROCK

Views : 1239

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Published Date : 2015-07-11T05:25:51.000Z

So Soon We Change is a 1979 album from Temptations singer, David Ruffin it was his first album for Warner Bros. Records after years of being with Motown.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 227959

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Published Date : 2013-05-11T11:16:34.000Z

As the lead singer of the Temptations, Ruffin was one of the most urbane and charismatic singers around. His work as a solo act was spotty at best. Writers and producers at Motown had Ruffin screaming at the top of his lungs over everything from run over dogs to Dear John letters. A 1970 set with his brother Jimmy Ruffin and a trio of albums with producer Van McCoy in the late 70's were the only respite from a steep artistic decline. Ruffin left Motown in 1977. This 1980 album presents him as more of a love man and is the follow up to 1979's Soon We Change, also produced by Don Davis. The most striking thing about this effort is Ruffin's voice. Unlike other singers of the raspy/loud type, his voice actually improved and he didn't have to resort to howls to make up for a lost midrange. Producer Don Davis plugged Ruffin into a polished, contemporary R&B setting that featured, among others, Leon Ware and Ronnie McNeir on backing vocals. "I Got a Thing for You has Ruffin coming on smooth and confident as he sings, "Felt the feeling, without a touch." He even has to laugh. The dramatic "Can We Make Love One More Time" shows Ruffin didn't lose his cool while begging. Even the borderline unctuous "Don't You Go Home works even though his "love call" should have made his object of desire head for the exits. Gentleman Ruffin is Ruffin's last album as a solo act. Although there are a few weak spots, no comprehensive Rufiin collection should be without it
    

Channel Title : DocRewdySoul

Views : 777725

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Published Date : 2011-12-11T07:47:18.000Z

The genius of David Ruffin ... written when he was 18 years old !
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 907873

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Published Date : 2013-05-06T15:21:11.000Z

''Who I Am'' (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : Desmond

Views : 75082

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Published Date : 2008-02-10T05:16:55.000Z

DON'T YOU GO HOME SO SOON WE CHANGE
    

Channel Title : extinct327

Views : 8811

Likes : 70

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Published Date : 2011-02-10T23:23:14.000Z

From the So Soon We Change album.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 18038

Likes : 122

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2013-05-10T17:14:19.000Z

As the lead singer of the Temptations, Ruffin was one of the most urbane and charismatic singers around. His work as a solo act was spotty at best. Writers and producers at Motown had Ruffin screaming at the top of his lungs over everything from run over dogs to Dear John letters. A 1970 set with his brother Jimmy Ruffin and a trio of albums with producer Van McCoy in the late 70's were the only respite from a steep artistic decline. Ruffin left Motown in 1977. This 1980 album presents him as more of a love man and is the follow up to 1979's Soon We Change, also produced by Don Davis. The most striking thing about this effort is Ruffin's voice. Unlike other singers of the raspy/loud type, his voice actually improved and he didn't have to resort to howls to make up for a lost midrange. Producer Don Davis plugged Ruffin into a polished, contemporary R&B setting that featured, among others, Leon Ware and Ronnie McNeir on backing vocals. "I Got a Thing for You has Ruffin coming on smooth and confident as he sings, "Felt the feeling, without a touch." He even has to laugh. The dramatic "Can We Make Love One More Time" shows Ruffin didn't lose his cool while begging. Even the borderline unctuous "Don't You Go Home works even though his "love call" should have made his object of desire head for the exits. Gentleman Ruffin is Ruffin's last album as a solo act. Although there are a few weak spots, no comprehensive Rufiin collection should be without it.
    

Channel Title : Gmanthemusicman

Views : 226

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Published Date : 2016-02-16T00:34:07.000Z

David Ruffin Created with http://tovid.io
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 27877

Likes : 230

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Published Date : 2013-05-10T02:15:40.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : avetrey

Views : 1061

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Published Date : 2009-01-26T20:45:21.000Z

Avetrey singing So soon we change by David Ruffin
    

Channel Title : TravelTheSpaceways

Views : 4874

Likes : 42

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Published Date : 2013-01-15T18:49:17.000Z

David Ruffin So Soon We Change LP [1979] Warner Bros. Records
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 3819

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Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:34:58.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Sexy Dancer · David Ruffin So Soon We Change ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: Don Davis Writer: Elwin Rutledge Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : malachi349

Views : 30994

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Published Date : 2010-03-18T13:36:50.000Z

From the album entitled "So Soon We Change" 1979
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 594501

Likes : 4485

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T00:45:32.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4797

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Published Date : 2013-05-09T23:35:11.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 3797

Likes : 14

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Published Date : 2013-05-10T07:10:47.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 39925

Likes : 322

DisLikes : 37

Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:35:43.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Slow Dance · David Ruffin Gentleman Ruffin ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: Curtis Gadson Writer: Ron Sanders Writer: Roz Newberry Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Rene Dawson

Views : 13828

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Published Date : 2012-04-14T22:08:12.000Z

The best soul voice!!!
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 8408

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Published Date : 2013-05-10T06:53:49.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6772

Likes : 45

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Published Date : 2013-05-09T23:21:19.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 27278

Likes : 196

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2013-05-09T19:12:08.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 104929

Likes : 744

DisLikes : 24

Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:05:55.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 7378

Likes : 54

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:35:38.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group I Get Excited · David Ruffin So Soon We Change ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: Steven Hairston Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : sugarbaby567

Views : 9294

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Published Date : 2010-03-04T12:55:44.000Z

This is one song that I absolutely love from David Ruffin. It's called Break my Heart from his album, So Soon We Change in 1979. ABSOLUTELY NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED!!! Images are from Google.com
    

Channel Title : Jah Wayne Records

Views : 255

Likes : 13

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Published Date : 2018-06-04T23:39:29.000Z

    

Channel Title : Kofemord

Views : 3229

Likes : 23

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-06-28T07:45:30.000Z

Rod Stewart / So Soon We Change / lyrics
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 7915

Likes : 73

DisLikes : 9

Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:36:24.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Break My Heart · David Ruffin So Soon We Change ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. Writer: David Garner Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : 2007wiifit

Views : 410161

Likes : 1479

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Published Date : 2008-02-16T03:34:36.000Z

David Ruffin - Break My Heart(1979)
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 15463

Likes : 93

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-11T11:09:07.000Z

As the lead singer of the Temptations, Ruffin was one of the most urbane and charismatic singers around. His work as a solo act was spotty at best. Writers and producers at Motown had Ruffin screaming at the top of his lungs over everything from run over dogs to Dear John letters. A 1970 set with his brother Jimmy Ruffin and a trio of albums with producer Van McCoy in the late 70's were the only respite from a steep artistic decline. Ruffin left Motown in 1977. This 1980 album presents him as more of a love man and is the follow up to 1979's Soon We Change, also produced by Don Davis. The most striking thing about this effort is Ruffin's voice. Unlike other singers of the raspy/loud type, his voice actually improved and he didn't have to resort to howls to make up for a lost midrange. Producer Don Davis plugged Ruffin into a polished, contemporary R&B setting that featured, among others, Leon Ware and Ronnie McNeir on backing vocals. "I Got a Thing for You has Ruffin coming on smooth and confident as he sings, "Felt the feeling, without a touch." He even has to laugh. The dramatic "Can We Make Love One More Time" shows Ruffin didn't lose his cool while begging. Even the borderline unctuous "Don't You Go Home works even though his "love call" should have made his object of desire head for the exits. Gentleman Ruffin is Ruffin's last album as a solo act. Although there are a few weak spots, no comprehensive Rufiin collection should be without it
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 33493

Likes : 338

DisLikes : 18

Published Date : 2013-05-06T14:43:33.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6129

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Published Date : 2013-05-10T01:27:56.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 88065

Likes : 648

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Published Date : 2013-05-11T18:04:41.000Z

As the lead singer of the Temptations, Ruffin was one of the most urbane and charismatic singers around. His work as a solo act was spotty at best. Writers and producers at Motown had Ruffin screaming at the top of his lungs over everything from run over dogs to Dear John letters. A 1970 set with his brother Jimmy Ruffin and a trio of albums with producer Van McCoy in the late 70's were the only respite from a steep artistic decline. Ruffin left Motown in 1977. This 1980 album presents him as more of a love man and is the follow up to 1979's Soon We Change, also produced by Don Davis. The most striking thing about this effort is Ruffin's voice. Unlike other singers of the raspy/loud type, his voice actually improved and he didn't have to resort to howls to make up for a lost midrange. Producer Don Davis plugged Ruffin into a polished, contemporary R&B setting that featured, among others, Leon Ware and Ronnie McNeir on backing vocals. "I Got a Thing for You has Ruffin coming on smooth and confident as he sings, "Felt the feeling, without a touch." He even has to laugh. The dramatic "Can We Make Love One More Time" shows Ruffin didn't lose his cool while begging. Even the borderline unctuous "Don't You Go Home works even though his "love call" should have made his object of desire head for the exits. Gentleman Ruffin is Ruffin's last album as a solo act. Although there are a few weak spots, no comprehensive Rufiin collection should be without it.
    

Channel Title : HerrPorinski

Views : 800

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Published Date : 2010-01-23T12:49:21.000Z

Nice Boogie, Disco Track from 1979, sounds a little bit like one of those Fatback Tunes
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 5766

Likes : 54

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:36:29.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Morning Sun Looks Blue · David Ruffin So Soon We Change ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: Michael Amitin Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : cRyanheh

Views : 401

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Published Date : 2012-09-14T13:50:25.000Z

Taken from 'Jacques Greene for TSUGI [TSUGI55]'
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 4680

Likes : 27

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Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:36:28.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Let's Stay Together · David Ruffin So Soon We Change ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: Don Davis Writer: Duane Freeman Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : SoulGalore ForYou

Views : 11

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Published Date : 2018-07-02T05:17:00.000Z

    

Channel Title : RENALD ROLLING

Views : 812

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Published Date : 2011-12-01T17:22:34.000Z

Warner Bros - Album - So Soon We Change - 1979 RENALDR1
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 19325

Likes : 147

DisLikes : 18

Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:37:49.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Don't You Go Home · David Ruffin Gentleman Ruffin ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: Anita Brown Auto-generated by YouTube.

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