David Ruffin My Love Is Growing Stronger 1969

David Ruffin My Love Is Growing Stronger 1969....!

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 27925

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Published Date : 2013-05-02T15:49:23.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 2159

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Published Date : 2016-11-03T03:49:02.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America My Love Is Growing Stronger · David Ruffin My Whole World Ended ℗ 1969 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1969-01-01 Producer: Harvey Fuqua Author, Composer: Johnny Bristol Author, Composer: M. Johnson Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : pieroangelo2

Views : 491

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Published Date : 2018-04-26T14:31:48.000Z

David Eli Ruffin (born Davis Eli Ruffin,[1] January 18, 1941 – June 1, 1991) was an American soul singer and musician most famous for his work as one of the lead singers of The Temptations (1964–68) during the group's "Classic Five" period as it was later known. He was the lead voice on such famous songs as "My Girl" and "Ain't Too Proud to Beg". Known for his unique raspy and anguished tenor vocals, Ruffin was ranked as one of the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine in 2008.[2] He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989 for his work with The Temptations.[3] Fellow Motown recording artist Marvin Gaye once said admiringly of Ruffin that, "I heard [in his voice] a strength my own voice lacked"
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 15896

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Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:13:04.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 194135

Likes : 1352

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Published Date : 2013-05-02T14:21:38.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 10583

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Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:53:14.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 22360

Likes : 133

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Published Date : 2013-05-02T14:54:21.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 9793

Likes : 80

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2013-05-02T15:32:59.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 98979

Likes : 715

DisLikes : 24

Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:05:55.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 38540

Likes : 267

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-03T05:57:03.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5555

Likes : 47

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:59:55.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : sharrell86

Views : 14829

Likes : 88

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2011-03-27T00:01:37.000Z

David Ruffin sings What Now My Love by the Temptations. He's backed by Eddie Kendricks. 1991 (the year of his death)
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 10159

Likes : 111

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-02T15:12:08.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 96662

Likes : 623

DisLikes : 40

Published Date : 2013-05-02T14:29:32.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 19501

Likes : 131

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2013-05-07T00:43:24.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 22569

Likes : 180

DisLikes : 13

Published Date : 2013-05-06T04:34:45.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin's My Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1973) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 12541

Likes : 114

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-02T14:46:20.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 1351

Likes : 15

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-11-03T03:46:01.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Flower Child · David Ruffin My Whole World Ended ℗ 1969 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1969-01-01 Producer: Harvey Fuqua Author, Composer: Johnny Bristol Author, Composer: Doris McNeil Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 15345

Likes : 142

DisLikes : 5

Published Date : 2013-05-02T15:58:53.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 48635

Likes : 287

DisLikes : 13

Published Date : 2013-05-02T15:02:06.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 15232

Likes : 114

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-05-02T14:38:22.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : Will Common

Views : 7090

Likes : 70

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2015-07-12T05:32:16.000Z

David Ruffin singing the french standard What Now My Love?. Originally called "Et Maintenant". Taken from the album "In A Mellow Mood". Which when it was in the process of being recorded, group member Paul Williams was extremely against the idea of doing a Pop cover album. He feared radio DJ's and fans alike would consider them sell outs. But in reality the exact opposite happened. It was meet with universal acclaim. Copyrights owned by Motown Records (1967).
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 40502

Likes : 311

DisLikes : 17

Published Date : 2013-05-05T23:41:23.000Z

1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1972) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : danbanrock1

Views : 41696

Likes : 430

DisLikes : 16

Published Date : 2016-06-23T20:46:11.000Z

Send donations to Saint Jude for cancer kids. All the medical staff don't get paid , they volunteer to treat the kids. How cool is that ? You can't beat that !!! Website link - Give !!! https://bit.ly/1fl0Hjn Classic David Ruffin song performed so well on the Upbeat TV show in Cleveland , 1969. Realy nice stereo redub mix by youtuber - Smurstools , I had to remix to a semi-Stereo Mono mix for more punch. I remasterd the video for best quality and added cool title cartoon pics of David. Enjoy !!! Come and subscribe to my Youtube & Russian Channels - danbanrock1 and view over 500 Bubblerock videos I made of classic music artists from the 50's 60's and 70s including many more Soul & Pop classics. Peace !!! , Dan     Some Great products to buy , recommended by me - check them out - 1) 15 Minute Manifestation - Blockbuster Personal Development Hit 2017 Link - https://bit.ly/2KBqgwj 2) Lean Belly Breakthrough New Conversion Machine With $61 Acv From Best Selling Author Bruce Krahn. The 2-minute Ritual Proven To Eliminate 1 Pound Per Day Of Dangerous Belly Fat. Link - https://bit.ly/2k89Lwr 3) The Lost Ways Evergreen Product That Made Fortunes On CB And Will Do So For You Too. Affiliates Who Got Rich Promoting It, Are Still Selling Big Time This Well Respected, Down To Earth Product! 1.36 Epc Link - https://bit.ly/2IvyTfi 4) His Secret Obsession - Incredibly High Conversions For Female Traffic. The link - https://bit.ly/2k6i4ZJ 5) Faith Diet | Fully Optimized Biblical Health And Christian Diet Offer - The Link - https://bit.ly/2IvYf8G 6) The Red Tea Detox - Huge New Weight Loss Offer For 2018! May Launch! (view mobile) Created By 2 Of The Highest Performing CB Vendors (red Smoothie Detox & 2 Week Diet) Comes A New Weight Loss Phenomenon. Fully Tested Vsl Proven To Convert The Link - https://bit.ly/2rUpQt7 7) 4 Offers: Fat Burning Kitchen, 101 Anti-aging Foods, Truthaboutabs Etc The Link - https://bit.ly/2LcudZB 8) Unlock Your Hip Flexors - Huge Conversion Boost For 2018 Uyhf Gives You A Practical, Easy-to-follow Program You Can Use To Instantly Release Your Hip Flexors For More Strength, Better Health And All Day Energy. Proven Swipes And Creatives Her The Link - https://bit.ly/2IusK39 9) 3 New Hot Offers: Coconut Oil, Honey & Apple Cider Vinegar The Link - https://bit.ly/2IMJge2 10) Quantum Manifestation Code - April 2018 New Law Of Attraction Offer! The Link - https://bit.ly/2rSYmF7 11) Massage Chair Deals - Great comfortable Massage Chairs to relax in comfort The Link - https://bit.ly/2IV8zeW ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 12) Inspired Spirit Coaching Academy Internationl coach training and certification. Get ahead in life with their training , learn from the most succesful and you will be succesful too. 1-Inspired Spirit Coaching Academy (goes to sales page) https://bit.ly/2xuJ5Qc 2-Inspired Spirit Coaching Academy free video training https://bit.ly/2xrjM1s 3-Inspired Spirit Coaching Academy free video training https://bit.ly/2L9f4qS ISCA June 2017- Free Videos - https://bit.ly/2xuuJ2e Raising Prosperity Consciousness Free Call https://bit.ly/2H3plm0 StarDoves Ad 1 https://bit.ly/2IYZ3TU WWW Free page opt-in https://bit.ly/2xBIcWf -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 13) Slotland Casino - Have fun , Play and Win Big Money !!! Online Casino !!! - Links - 1) Slotland & Slotland Mobile - https://bit.ly/2J1f9Az 2) Win A Day Casino & Win A Day Mobile Casino https://bit.ly/2smfFPl 3) Slotland Affiliates https://bit.ly/2ssjQs7 4) Freeslot – free nonstop slot tournament https://bit.ly/2J3WT5k ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- More to come !!! 14) Mansion Casinos – Online Gambling Fun - Have fun , Play and Win Big Money !!! Online Casino !!! - Links – 1) Join Now – https://bit.ly/2sLX1Qf 2) Welcome Bonus – https://bit.ly/2Jv9Ybp 3) Probable of winning – https://bit.ly/2M1738N 4) Italy home page – Join Now – https://bit.ly/2sLyfj9 5) Mobile Cat Queen Flash Game – https://bit.ly/2JjzGfS 6) Mobile Pharaoh’s Secret Flash Game - https://bit.ly/2sDcYsH 7) Mobile Blackjack 5 Hands Flash Game – https://bit.ly/2Jq0OJS 8) Viaden Android/IOS https://bit.ly/2sLoq4S 9) Home page Italy – https://bit.ly/2JdDkMh 10) MC EN ZA – Choose Your Game – R50,000 https://bit.ly/2sMIWBY ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- FOR ALL YOU MILLION AND BILLIONAIRS GREAT BEAUTIFUL SUPER YACHT FOR SALE – NERRISA E-MAIL ME FOR MORE INFO – DAN BAN DANBANIC@HOTMAIL.COM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 9684

Likes : 70

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-02T15:41:08.000Z

After rising to superstardom as the Temptations' co-lead vocalist, David Ruffin concluded his oft-tumultuous relationship with the Motown quintet to forge a solo career. His debut album was less a statement regarding his status as a former Temp and more a reflection of the artist's temperament. Although drugs would begin to erode his immeasurable talents from the inside out, Ruffin can be heard at the top of his game on My Whole World Ended (1969). While he may have been out of the band, he was still considered a key component in the Motown family and, at least for a while, was afforded support by the best and brightest that the label had to offer. Among the perks was working with top-notch hit making producers Harvey Fuqua, Johnny Bristol, Paul Riser,and Ivory Joe Hunter -- all of whom add their magic to the mix. Ruffin's vocals are uniformly inspired, particularly when he pours himself into the performance. The LP kicks off with the title track, "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)." The song's dark and somewhat menacing tone provides all the atmosphere Ruffin needs to unleash his trademark heart-wrenching leads. It is no wonder that the number made a significant impact as a Top Ten crossover smash. As was the assembly line nature of new Motown product, quite often the deeper cuts were just as appealing, especially when it was David Ruffin behind the microphone. The mid-tempo soul-stirrer "Pieces of a Man," as well as the churning funk-a-thons "World of Darkness" and "Flower Child" may be the effort's sleeper classics. Ruffin certainly isn't afraid to wear his heart on his sleeve either as the ballads "Message from Maria," "I've Lost Everything I've Ever Loved" and the radiant waltz "My Love Is Growing Stronger" demonstrate to great effect. Pop music fans will undoubtedly recognize the melody to "Everlasting Love" as it had already been a hit for Robert Knight two years earlier in 1967, while Carl Carlton -- a fellow Detroit-based singer -- would score even higher with his 1974 update. Perhaps the same fate could have befallen Ruffin's take had it been extracted as a single release. In the end the project didn't need too much help to take to the top of the R&B album survey for two weeks and into the Top 40 on the pop side. Parties looking for My Whole World Ended on CD are encouraged to check out the Hip-O Select Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology. The contents have been digitally remastered and also offer Ruffin's follow-up long-players Feelin' Good (1969), David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974).
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 1931

Likes : 26

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2016-11-03T03:45:57.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America I've Got To Find Myself A Brand New Baby · David Ruffin My Whole World Ended ℗ 1969 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1969-01-01 Producer: Harvey Fuqua Author, Composer: Susan DePasse Author, Composer: Johnny Bristol Author, Composer: Harvey Fuqua Author, Composer: Marv Johnson Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : J. Boutte

Views : 58436

Likes : 491

DisLikes : 16

Published Date : 2013-04-05T23:29:48.000Z

    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 2065

Likes : 14

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-11-03T03:44:49.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Somebody Stole My Dream · David Ruffin My Whole World Ended ℗ 1969 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1969-01-01 Producer: Ivy Jo Hunter Author, Composer: Henry Cosby Author, Composer: Joe Hinton Author, Composer: Pamela Sawyer Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6547

Likes : 54

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:39:27.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 16689

Likes : 144

DisLikes : 12

Published Date : 2013-05-12T19:30:16.000Z

Rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 21172

Likes : 150

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:32:18.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6099

Likes : 39

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-04T13:48:02.000Z

It's well known that Motown recorded more material than it could release, but its reasons for shelving material remain a mystery to this day. Ever since the CD reissue boom of the late '80s, this unreleased material has begun to trickle out of the vaults, and when it does surface in such forms as the dynamite double-disc set A Cellarful of Motown!, the music is so good it's hard to believe that it never was released at the time. Knowing this, it should not come as a complete surprise that former Temptations lead singer David Ruffin had a full, completed album shelved in 1971, but hearing Hip-O Select's excavation of that album on the 2004 release David: The Unreleased Album, it's still a wonder that this record sat in the vaults for over three decades, with very few of the songs recorded during the sessions appearing on other records and compilations over the years. Far from being unreleasable, David (titled as such because the album was never given a proper title -- it was given a catalog number and track sequencing, with David Ruffin penciled in as its name, but that was used as the title for his 1973 album) finds Ruffin at a solo peak, not just a singer but in terms of material. He cut the 12 songs that comprised the album, along with the seven bonus tracks from the same sessions that fill out this CD reissue, in late 1969 and 1970, after he had a big solo hit with "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)," with the intent of releasing the album in 1971. There were a pair of covers of recent hits -- an appropriately heartbroken and seductive "Rainy Night in Georgia" and a rather revelatory "I Want You Back," which added real grit to the Jackson 5's effervescent smash -- but most of this was material written for Ruffin and it played to his strengths. While this music was rooted in Motown's signature sound and performed by the Funk Brothers, it also looked beyond Detroit, adding heavy doses of funk, psychedelia, and smooth soul, filled with galvanizing horns, driving guitars, down-n-dirty clavinets, flourishes of electric sitar, fuzz tones, and wah-wah guitars, all grounded by Ruffin's earthy testifying and tied together by top-notch songwriting. All these elements wound up sounding much hipper than much of the music officially released by Motown in the early 1970, when Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye were just beginning to break free of the studio's formula, and while David and its accompanying bonus tracks are not a masterpiece along the lines of Talking Book or What's Going On (or even Where I'm Coming From, for that matter), it's vibrant, exciting music that still sounds fresh -- arguably fresher than full-length Temptations albums of the late '60s -- which qualifies it as a lost classic of sorts. Why was it lost, consigned to the vaults for nearly three and a half decades? According to the liner notes, nobody really knows. Ruffin wasn't popular among the executives at Motown in the early '70s, and he was also going through a number of well-documented personal problems, so it's possible that Motown simply didn't want to promote him at the time, but it's also true that the label had a number of great records, including Marvin's What's Going On, to release in 1971, and Ruffin had two LPs out in 1970, including a duet album with his brother Jimmy, so the market may have been saturated. We'll likely never know the reason why David was buried, but fortunately it has been unearthed, and it's a reason for hardcore soul and Motown fans to celebrate.
    

Channel Title : D P

Views : 130

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2012-07-15T20:56:32.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 14477

Likes : 120

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-03T15:56:34.000Z

With neither Ruffin brother experiencing significant success in the wake of their non-simultaneous departure from the Temptations, Jimmy latched upon the idea of recording a duet album with the younger David -- partially as a way to pay tribute to their recently passed parents, partially as a way to jump-start their stalled careers. In regards to the latter, 1970's I Am My Brother's Keeper was no great shakes, barely scraping the pop charts and its lead single "Stand by Me" only reaching 24 on the R&B charts, but as a testament to the familial talents of the Ruffins, the LP succeeds, proving that these two great voices could enliven familiar tunes. It's a knack that's needed here, for much of I Am My Brother's Keeper consists of splashy, sequin-studded and polyester-draped covers of pop and R&B hits. Just under half of the album consists of versions of tunes by the Hollies, Ben E. King, the Delfonics and Tyrone Davis, with the rest of the record coming from in-house Motown writers and elsewhere, including the rousing Gloria Jones co-write "When My Love Hand Comes Down." This is one of five Bobby Taylor productions on the LP, and he gives the Ruffins soulful, funky sounds that showcase them at their best, with Henry Cosby, Duke Browner, Frank Wilson and Al Kent responsible for the songs that edge a little closer to the pop charts. Combined, all the producers provide a sampler of Motown sounds at the dawn of the '70s -- sometimes things are deeply funky, sometimes things are slick enough for a televised variety revue -- but the Ruffins pull it all together, sounding comfortable in every setting, always commanding attention. Perhaps its underwhelming commercial performance is understandable -- there are no true knockouts here, just a bunch of strong soul -- but I Am My Brother's Keeper is an album that seems stronger in retrospect, as it was the last time one of the great brother teams in soul sung together so joyfully. [Hip-O Select's 2010 reissue adds the excellent unreleased "You're What I Need (Not What I Want)" -- produced by Bobby Taylor and co-written by Gloria Jones and Pamela Sawyer -- and a mix of "Stand by Me" that removes the fake live overdubs of the original.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 83347

Likes : 484

DisLikes : 10

Published Date : 2013-05-04T13:09:04.000Z

It's well known that Motown recorded more material than it could release, but its reasons for shelving material remain a mystery to this day. Ever since the CD reissue boom of the late '80s, this unreleased material has begun to trickle out of the vaults, and when it does surface in such forms as the dynamite double-disc set A Cellarful of Motown!, the music is so good it's hard to believe that it never was released at the time. Knowing this, it should not come as a complete surprise that former Temptations lead singer David Ruffin had a full, completed album shelved in 1971, but hearing Hip-O Select's excavation of that album on the 2004 release David: The Unreleased Album, it's still a wonder that this record sat in the vaults for over three decades, with very few of the songs recorded during the sessions appearing on other records and compilations over the years. Far from being unreleasable, David (titled as such because the album was never given a proper title -- it was given a catalog number and track sequencing, with David Ruffin penciled in as its name, but that was used as the title for his 1973 album) finds Ruffin at a solo peak, not just a singer but in terms of material. He cut the 12 songs that comprised the album, along with the seven bonus tracks from the same sessions that fill out this CD reissue, in late 1969 and 1970, after he had a big solo hit with "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)," with the intent of releasing the album in 1971. There were a pair of covers of recent hits -- an appropriately heartbroken and seductive "Rainy Night in Georgia" and a rather revelatory "I Want You Back," which added real grit to the Jackson 5's effervescent smash -- but most of this was material written for Ruffin and it played to his strengths. While this music was rooted in Motown's signature sound and performed by the Funk Brothers, it also looked beyond Detroit, adding heavy doses of funk, psychedelia, and smooth soul, filled with galvanizing horns, driving guitars, down-n-dirty clavinets, flourishes of electric sitar, fuzz tones, and wah-wah guitars, all grounded by Ruffin's earthy testifying and tied together by top-notch songwriting. All these elements wound up sounding much hipper than much of the music officially released by Motown in the early 1970, when Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye were just beginning to break free of the studio's formula, and while David and its accompanying bonus tracks are not a masterpiece along the lines of Talking Book or What's Going On (or even Where I'm Coming From, for that matter), it's vibrant, exciting music that still sounds fresh -- arguably fresher than full-length Temptations albums of the late '60s -- which qualifies it as a lost classic of sorts. Why was it lost, consigned to the vaults for nearly three and a half decades? According to the liner notes, nobody really knows. Ruffin wasn't popular among the executives at Motown in the early '70s, and he was also going through a number of well-documented personal problems, so it's possible that Motown simply didn't want to promote him at the time, but it's also true that the label had a number of great records, including Marvin's What's Going On, to release in 1971, and Ruffin had two LPs out in 1970, including a duet album with his brother Jimmy, so the market may have been saturated. We'll likely never know the reason why David was buried, but fortunately it has been unearthed, and it's a reason for hardcore soul and Motown fans to celebrate.
    

Channel Title : Dantz Music Studio

Views : 15798

Likes : 131

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2012-07-25T04:17:04.000Z

From the 1970 album "I Am My Brother's Keeper"
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4519

Likes : 39

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:18:42.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5928

Likes : 40

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-03T06:25:41.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 3266

Likes : 21

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-06T05:47:05.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1972) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 18361

Likes : 119

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-05-04T13:17:44.000Z

It's well known that Motown recorded more material than it could release, but its reasons for shelving material remain a mystery to this day. Ever since the CD reissue boom of the late '80s, this unreleased material has begun to trickle out of the vaults, and when it does surface in such forms as the dynamite double-disc set A Cellarful of Motown!, the music is so good it's hard to believe that it never was released at the time. Knowing this, it should not come as a complete surprise that former Temptations lead singer David Ruffin had a full, completed album shelved in 1971, but hearing Hip-O Select's excavation of that album on the 2004 release David: The Unreleased Album, it's still a wonder that this record sat in the vaults for over three decades, with very few of the songs recorded during the sessions appearing on other records and compilations over the years. Far from being unreleasable, David (titled as such because the album was never given a proper title -- it was given a catalog number and track sequencing, with David Ruffin penciled in as its name, but that was used as the title for his 1973 album) finds Ruffin at a solo peak, not just a singer but in terms of material. He cut the 12 songs that comprised the album, along with the seven bonus tracks from the same sessions that fill out this CD reissue, in late 1969 and 1970, after he had a big solo hit with "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)," with the intent of releasing the album in 1971. There were a pair of covers of recent hits -- an appropriately heartbroken and seductive "Rainy Night in Georgia" and a rather revelatory "I Want You Back," which added real grit to the Jackson 5's effervescent smash -- but most of this was material written for Ruffin and it played to his strengths. While this music was rooted in Motown's signature sound and performed by the Funk Brothers, it also looked beyond Detroit, adding heavy doses of funk, psychedelia, and smooth soul, filled with galvanizing horns, driving guitars, down-n-dirty clavinets, flourishes of electric sitar, fuzz tones, and wah-wah guitars, all grounded by Ruffin's earthy testifying and tied together by top-notch songwriting. All these elements wound up sounding much hipper than much of the music officially released by Motown in the early 1970, when Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye were just beginning to break free of the studio's formula, and while David and its accompanying bonus tracks are not a masterpiece along the lines of Talking Book or What's Going On (or even Where I'm Coming From, for that matter), it's vibrant, exciting music that still sounds fresh -- arguably fresher than full-length Temptations albums of the late '60s -- which qualifies it as a lost classic of sorts. Why was it lost, consigned to the vaults for nearly three and a half decades? According to the liner notes, nobody really knows. Ruffin wasn't popular among the executives at Motown in the early '70s, and he was also going through a number of well-documented personal problems, so it's possible that Motown simply didn't want to promote him at the time, but it's also true that the label had a number of great records, including Marvin's What's Going On, to release in 1971, and Ruffin had two LPs out in 1970, including a duet album with his brother Jimmy, so the market may have been saturated. We'll likely never know the reason why David was buried, but fortunately it has been unearthed, and it's a reason for hardcore soul and Motown fans to celebrate.
    

Channel Title : extinct327

Views : 8252

Likes : 70

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2012-07-10T23:32:55.000Z

Released around late 1962-early 1963 before David Ruffin joined The Temptations
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6812

Likes : 43

DisLikes : 5

Published Date : 2013-05-03T16:53:00.000Z

With neither Ruffin brother experiencing significant success in the wake of their non-simultaneous departure from the Temptations, Jimmy latched upon the idea of recording a duet album with the younger David -- partially as a way to pay tribute to their recently passed parents, partially as a way to jump-start their stalled careers. In regards to the latter, 1970's I Am My Brother's Keeper was no great shakes, barely scraping the pop charts and its lead single "Stand by Me" only reaching 24 on the R&B charts, but as a testament to the familial talents of the Ruffins, the LP succeeds, proving that these two great voices could enliven familiar tunes. It's a knack that's needed here, for much of I Am My Brother's Keeper consists of splashy, sequin-studded and polyester-draped covers of pop and R&B hits. Just under half of the album consists of versions of tunes by the Hollies, Ben E. King, the Delfonics and Tyrone Davis, with the rest of the record coming from in-house Motown writers and elsewhere, including the rousing Gloria Jones co-write "When My Love Hand Comes Down." This is one of five Bobby Taylor productions on the LP, and he gives the Ruffins soulful, funky sounds that showcase them at their best, with Henry Cosby, Duke Browner, Frank Wilson and Al Kent responsible for the songs that edge a little closer to the pop charts. Combined, all the producers provide a sampler of Motown sounds at the dawn of the '70s -- sometimes things are deeply funky, sometimes things are slick enough for a televised variety revue -- but the Ruffins pull it all together, sounding comfortable in every setting, always commanding attention. Perhaps its underwhelming commercial performance is understandable -- there are no true knockouts here, just a bunch of strong soul -- but I Am My Brother's Keeper is an album that seems stronger in retrospect, as it was the last time one of the great brother teams in soul sung together so joyfully. [Hip-O Select's 2010 reissue adds the excellent unreleased "You're What I Need (Not What I Want)" -- produced by Bobby Taylor and co-written by Gloria Jones and Pamela Sawyer -- and a mix of "Stand by Me" that removes the fake live overdubs of the original.
    

Channel Title : Mick Love

Views : 1226

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2009-10-29T05:35:03.000Z

David Ruffin Classic.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 10845

Likes : 55

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-06T14:47:37.000Z

"Who I Am" (1975) former Temptations' vocalist David Ruffin joins forces with the multi-talented Van McCoy. McCoy -- who produced and arranged the album -- was a hot commodity thanks to his disco hit "The Hustle." Although Motown had relocated to Los Angeles, Ruffin and McCoy brought the project to New York City and availed themselves of the finest studio musicians that the Big Apple had to offer: Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), and Steve Gadd (drums), just to mention a few. The opening midtempo title composition sets the pace and establishes the prevalent dance-centric nature. "It Takes All Kinds of People to Make a World" continues in the same four-on-the-four rhythmic vein with the McCoy-directed string section. Ruffin's "Walk Away from Love" -- which actually made it all the way to the number one slot on the R&B Singles survey -- bears an easygoing boogie enhanced by typical string and horn punctuations. Ruffin's begging lead vocals are reminders of his once golden throat. "I've Got Nothing but Time" and the light and lively "Finger Pointers" stand out as two of the catchier selections on the disc, the latter soaking up every McCoy element in the book -- syrupy strings, a pulsating groove, and enough of a syncopated melody to hook even the most jaded listener. The slightly Eastern-flavored arrangement on "Wild Honey" provides a bit of much needed stylistic variety -- although it doesn't stray too far -- while "Heavy Love" is essentially structured as if remaking "The Hustle." No wonder it climbed into the upper reaches of the R&B countdown. "Statue of a Fool" proves that Ruffin can still churn out a heartfelt ballad. Granted his delivery doesn't have the gut-check realism that informed the best of his Temptations' and first couple of solo sides, however it is suitably matched to the half-hearted material. Who I Am concludes on an up note with the funky and driving "Love Can Be Hazardous to Your Health." Ruffin manages to coax out a few of his vintage tonsil-grinding growls as he pleads for the listener to "...beware...beware...beware" before instigating a lyrical call-and-response. The cut was twice a 7" bridesmaid, appearing as the B-side to both "Walk Away from Love" and "Heavy Love." Hip-O Select gathered Who I Am along with the artist's last Motown long-players Everything's Coming Up Love (1976) and In My Stride (1977), as well as a dozen previously unreleased bonus tracks for Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition.
    

Channel Title : mosogotam

Views : 2992

Likes : 31

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2012-02-08T12:00:07.000Z

No copyright infringement intended. Requested by "idaslpdhr". Another of my favorite Motown songs that I had to extend. Not only is David's vocal out of the park, but the Funk Brothers backing track, the Andantes and the Originals background vocals and the Detroit Symphony Strings never sounded more amazing. Pardon the phaser sounds...when I created this mix a couple of years ago, I was into a "Nathan Jones" "Itchycoo Park" mood! And DIG that SITAR!!

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