David Ruffin If Loving You Is Wrong I Dont Want To Be Right 1973....!

About 20 results out of 7020 (0.23 seconds)
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 263711

Likes : 2288

DisLikes : 74

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:16:09.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 7107

Likes : 131

DisLikes : 23

Published Date : 2017-01-25T21:44:13.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America [If Loving You Is Wrong] I Don't Want To Be Right · David Ruffin David Ruffin ℗ 1973 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1973-01-01 Author, Composer: Homer Banks Author, Composer: Carl Mitchell Hampton Author, Composer: Raymond M. Jackson Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Brad Hales

Views : 131410

Likes : 725

DisLikes : 30

Published Date : 2011-12-05T21:33:51.000Z

Taken from a 70's Detroit public access TV appearance. Who on earth is this band?! So raw and so good. Watch the note he holds forever towards the end... where is the rest of this footage?
    

Channel Title : Nicolas Reboux

Views : 4374

Likes : 45

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-06-01T01:46:54.000Z

David Ruffin " If Loving You Is Wrong I Don't Want To Be Right " Lp : Same ( 1973 ) Motown Records
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 33767

Likes : 272

DisLikes : 13

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:58:45.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 595980

Likes : 4495

DisLikes : 259

Published Date : 2013-05-05T00:45:32.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : Mauro Groove Zanchetta

Views : 57

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-02-20T11:28:53.000Z

Jazz Funky Rare Groove Blues Soul Disco Brasil Easy Listening Library Blaxploitation Soundtrack B-Movie '60s -'70s ONLY '60 & '70 !!
    

Channel Title : Djemouls Soulparadise

Views : 947

Likes : 17

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-12-15T19:25:21.000Z

    

Channel Title : 1muzikfreek

Views : 318365

Likes : 2683

DisLikes : 83

Published Date : 2011-02-12T18:42:01.000Z

From the 1974 LP, "Caught Up/Still Caught Up"...........Enjoy!
    

Channel Title : Arqamani

Views : 4098

Likes : 42

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2012-07-12T15:15:19.000Z

Luther Ingram est l'une des icônes intemporelles et inoubliables de la soul sudiste des années 70-80. Également auteur très respecté, il s'est rendu célèbre grâce à des tubes comme « (If loving you is wrong) I don't want to be right » ou encore « Respect yourself » qu'il a écrit pour The Staple Singers.
    

Channel Title : Aleksandar Stricevic

Views : 82480

Likes : 285

DisLikes : 14

Published Date : 2009-09-11T20:40:41.000Z

Great song version from great sir Tom Jones
    

Channel Title : Soul Planète

Views : 26

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-11-28T18:55:57.000Z

    

Channel Title : Bobby Bland - Topic

Views : 1323

Likes : 27

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-07-24T21:28:30.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America [If Loving You Is Wrong] I Don't Want To Be Right · Bobby Bland His California Album ℗ 1973 Geffen Records Released on: 1991-01-01 Author, Composer: Homer Banks Author, Composer: Carl Mitchell Hampton Author, Composer: Raymond M. Jackson Music Publisher: Irving Music, Inc. Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 54924

Likes : 326

DisLikes : 18

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:10:26.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : Luther Ingram - Topic

Views : 45293

Likes : 1626

DisLikes : 202

Published Date : 2014-11-06T02:42:27.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don't Want To Be Right) · Luther Ingram Wattstax: Highlights From The Soundtrack ℗ 2003 Stax Records Released on: 2004-01-01 Author, Composer: Homer Banks Author, Composer: Raymond Jackson Author, Composer: Carl Hampton Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4354

Likes : 21

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2013-05-05T07:03:17.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : mykie253

Views : 225430

Likes : 2050

DisLikes : 60

Published Date : 2013-07-13T00:20:12.000Z

Percy Sledge - If Loving You Is Wrong (I Don't Want To Be Right)
    

Channel Title : Stax Records

Views : 44121

Likes : 375

DisLikes : 21

Published Date : 2015-03-25T17:43:31.000Z

Shop the Stax Online Store: http://found.ee/StaxRecordsStore Pick up exclusive collectible items, plus music from your favorite Stax artists and legends. Multiplatinum-selling artist Isaac Hayes, dubbed “Black Moses” during the height of his popularity, revolutionized soul music, leading it out of the era of the three-minute single into a new area—the orchestrated concept album with (very) extended cuts. Hayes began his career as a pianist and staff writer for Stax Records, and, alongside songwriting partner David Porter, wrote some of the biggest hits of the 1960’s, including “Soul Man” and “Hold On! I’m Comin’” for Sam & Dave. Expanding his repertoire, Hayes penned the iconic soundtrack for 1971’s Shaft. The album became Hayes’s fourth consecutive platinum LP and the “Theme from Shaft” earned him an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Though often known for his larger than life persona, Hayes’ musical accomplishments – which laid the groundwork for disco and rap – established him as one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. The Ultimate Isaac Hayes: Can You Dig It? iTunes: http://smarturl.it/UltmtIsaacHayes Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/staxrecords Twitter: https://twitter.com/staxrecords
    

Channel Title : ladyknowz

Views : 585429

Likes : 4672

DisLikes : 134

Published Date : 2012-05-02T22:06:00.000Z

THE LYRICS: If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If being right means being without you I'd rather be wrong than right. Your mama and daddy say it's a shame It's a downright disgrace Long as I got you by my side I don't care what your people say Your friends tell you it's no future in loving a married man But, If I can't see you when I want I'll see you when I can If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right Am I wrong to fall so deeply in love with you knowing I got a wife and two little children depending on me too And am I wrong to hunger for the gentleness of your touch knowing I got someone else at home who needs me just as much And are you wrong to give your love to a married man And am I wrong to try to hold on to the best thing I ever had If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right Are you wrong to give your love to a married man And am I wrong trying to hold on to the best thing I ever had If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right I don't wanna be right If it means being without you I don't want to be right if it means just slipping at night I don't wanna be right If Loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right
    

Channel Title : Ramsey Lewis - Topic

Views : 1303

Likes : 26

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2015-01-20T13:53:48.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment If Loving You Is Wrong I Don't Want To Be Right · Ramsey Lewis / 雷姆希路易斯 Love Songs ℗ 1973 Sony BMG Music Entertainment Released on: 2004-12-28 Composer, Lyricist: H. Banks Composer, Lyricist: R.E. Jackson Composer, Lyricist: C. M. Hampton Producer: Teo Macero Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 39738

Likes : 433

DisLikes : 19

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:47:40.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : Luther Ingram - Topic

Views : 3284

Likes : 89

DisLikes : 5

Published Date : 2016-01-08T18:14:16.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Redeye Distribution [If Loving You Is Wrong] I Don't Want To Be Right · Luther Ingram Absolutely The Best Of Luther Ingram:If Loving You Is Wrong ℗ 2010 Irving Music Inc. Released on: 2011-05-15 Composer: Homer Banks/ Carl Hampton/ Raymond Jackson Music Publisher: Irving Music Inc. Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Ace Records Ltd

Views : 278076

Likes : 1934

DisLikes : 94

Published Date : 2014-08-19T09:24:24.000Z

Official audio for (If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want To Be Right by Millie Jackson, released on Ace Records. Subscribe to the official Ace channel for more classics, lost gems, playlists, and more: http://www.youtube.com/AceRecordsBroadcast http://acerecords.co.uk/21-of-the-best-1971-83
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6565

Likes : 34

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-04T13:56:28.000Z

It's well known that Motown recorded more material than it could release, but its reasons for shelving material remain a mystery to this day. Ever since the CD reissue boom of the late '80s, this unreleased material has begun to trickle out of the vaults, and when it does surface in such forms as the dynamite double-disc set A Cellarful of Motown!, the music is so good it's hard to believe that it never was released at the time. Knowing this, it should not come as a complete surprise that former Temptations lead singer David Ruffin had a full, completed album shelved in 1971, but hearing Hip-O Select's excavation of that album on the 2004 release David: The Unreleased Album, it's still a wonder that this record sat in the vaults for over three decades, with very few of the songs recorded during the sessions appearing on other records and compilations over the years. Far from being unreleasable, David (titled as such because the album was never given a proper title -- it was given a catalog number and track sequencing, with David Ruffin penciled in as its name, but that was used as the title for his 1973 album) finds Ruffin at a solo peak, not just a singer but in terms of material. He cut the 12 songs that comprised the album, along with the seven bonus tracks from the same sessions that fill out this CD reissue, in late 1969 and 1970, after he had a big solo hit with "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)," with the intent of releasing the album in 1971. There were a pair of covers of recent hits -- an appropriately heartbroken and seductive "Rainy Night in Georgia" and a rather revelatory "I Want You Back," which added real grit to the Jackson 5's effervescent smash -- but most of this was material written for Ruffin and it played to his strengths. While this music was rooted in Motown's signature sound and performed by the Funk Brothers, it also looked beyond Detroit, adding heavy doses of funk, psychedelia, and smooth soul, filled with galvanizing horns, driving guitars, down-n-dirty clavinets, flourishes of electric sitar, fuzz tones, and wah-wah guitars, all grounded by Ruffin's earthy testifying and tied together by top-notch songwriting. All these elements wound up sounding much hipper than much of the music officially released by Motown in the early 1970, when Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye were just beginning to break free of the studio's formula, and while David and its accompanying bonus tracks are not a masterpiece along the lines of Talking Book or What's Going On (or even Where I'm Coming From, for that matter), it's vibrant, exciting music that still sounds fresh -- arguably fresher than full-length Temptations albums of the late '60s -- which qualifies it as a lost classic of sorts. Why was it lost, consigned to the vaults for nearly three and a half decades? According to the liner notes, nobody really knows. Ruffin wasn't popular among the executives at Motown in the early '70s, and he was also going through a number of well-documented personal problems, so it's possible that Motown simply didn't want to promote him at the time, but it's also true that the label had a number of great records, including Marvin's What's Going On, to release in 1971, and Ruffin had two LPs out in 1970, including a duet album with his brother Jimmy, so the market may have been saturated. We'll likely never know the reason why David was buried, but fortunately it has been unearthed, and it's a reason for hardcore soul and Motown fans to celebrate.
    

Channel Title : Sheeks15

Views : 34959

Likes : 233

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2009-08-03T16:52:04.000Z

by Ramsey Lewis.
    

Channel Title : Rockinjac Channel

Views : 18867

Likes : 124

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2015-02-01T02:15:05.000Z

From the TONIGHT I'M YOURS TOUR, ROD sings IF LOVING YOU IS WRONG
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 17109

Likes : 142

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:54:53.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : Luther Ingram - Topic

Views : 36209

Likes : 1399

DisLikes : 252

Published Date : 2014-12-25T17:24:33.000Z

Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises [If Loving You Is Wrong] I Don't Want to Be Right · Luther Ingram (If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right ℗ 2008 LocoBop Released on: 2008-05-07 Music Publisher: Irving / Klondike Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : BARMAHOSYBARPILON

Views : 79136

Likes : 480

DisLikes : 15

Published Date : 2012-05-30T13:32:04.000Z

If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If being right means being without you I'd rather live a wrong doing life Your mama and daddy say it's a shame It's a downright disgrace Long as I got you by my side I don't care what your people say Your friends tell you there's no future In loving a married man If I can't see you when I want to I'll see you when I can If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right Am I wrong to fall so deeply in love with you Knowing I got a wife and two little children Depending on me too And am I wrong to hunger for the gentleness of your touch knowing I got somebody else at home who needs me just as much And are you wrong to fall in love With a married man And am I wrong trying to hold on To the best thing I ever had If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right Are you wrong to give your love To a married man And am I wrong trying to hold on To the best thing I ever had If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right If loving you is wrong I don't wanna be right I don't wanna be right If it means sleeping alone at night I don't wanna be right If it means coming home at night I don't wanna, I don't wanna I don't wanna never, never, never be right
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5783

Likes : 60

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-05-05T14:44:17.000Z

[BONUS TRACK] "Crime in the Street" from David's (Motown Solo albums Vol.1) David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : Jason Madore

Views : 640

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2014-09-17T03:33:19.000Z

Written by Homer Banks, Raymond Jackson & Carl Hampton. Sung by Luther Ingram (1937-2007). Produced by Johnny Baylor. The other side is "Always".
    

Channel Title : LudaMalaMara

Views : 7768

Likes : 72

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2012-04-07T21:53:02.000Z

"Unbonded" (1973)
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 43756

Likes : 244

DisLikes : 22

Published Date : 2013-05-04T21:16:34.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : Ahmed Essa

Views : 4012

Likes : 41

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-07-18T14:29:21.000Z

From his self titled album 1986
    

Channel Title : Sébastien DAVID

Views : 39075

Likes : 594

DisLikes : 8

Published Date : 2014-06-11T14:20:57.000Z

Sample beat by Snowb !! Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/sebastien.david.395?ref=tn_tnmn
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 10635

Likes : 70

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-05-03T08:54:18.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : Jorge Carlos

Views : 112955

Likes : 675

DisLikes : 26

Published Date : 2010-09-04T19:36:41.000Z

If Loving You Is Wrong I Don't Wanna Be Right
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 43874

Likes : 305

DisLikes : 20

Published Date : 2013-05-06T05:29:11.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1973) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : HIGH SCHOOL MEDIA

Views : 19488

Likes : 139

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2015-12-29T10:07:00.000Z

This is the last episode of our sad movie. You will find out what happen to PIGGY after PUPPY gone away from her. Thanks so much for everyone who support this movie and watch from the beginning till the end. Hope we can make more movies for all of you to watch again in 2016.
    

Channel Title : SparkilusSoze

Views : 4351

Likes : 27

DisLikes : 7

Published Date : 2013-08-09T00:38:34.000Z

Beautiful remake of the ballad by a Jamaican group of singers called "Natural High" "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" is a soul song written by Stax Records songwriters Homer Banks, Carl Hampton and Raymond Jackson. It has been performed by many singers, most notably by Luther Ingram. The song is about an adulterous love affair, told from the point of view of either the mistress or the cheating spouse, depending on the performer. Regardless, both parties involved express their desire to maintain the affair, while at the same time acknowledging that the relationship is morally wrong.
    

Channel Title : InformarapChile1

Views : 2998

Likes : 19

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-08-10T03:40:25.000Z

Sample del beat echo por ARB , del tema "Día de entrenamiento" de adickta sinfonia del mas reciente album!
    

Channel Title : Jan van Breda

Views : 947976

Likes : 2741

DisLikes : 95

Published Date : 2007-10-29T12:27:36.000Z

Millie Jackson - If Loving You Is Wrong I Don't Want To Be Right
    

Channel Title : Neil Russell

Views : 1580

Likes : 9

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-11-03T20:38:11.000Z

From the 1988 compilation "Down Home Blues"
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 33338

Likes : 321

DisLikes : 16

Published Date : 2013-05-06T04:59:23.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1973) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : Chaivut Ukosakul

Views : 166113

Likes : 971

DisLikes : 46

Published Date : 2012-07-21T16:05:12.000Z

YouAPI-1


Facebook Page Like Box ::