David Ruffin Go On With Your Bad Self 1973

David Ruffin Go On With Your Bad Self 1973....!

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T07:03:17.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : patricelarrar

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Published Date : 2011-03-27T11:30:55.000Z

David Ruffin - Go on with your bad self Motown Records
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

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Published Date : 2017-01-25T21:38:19.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Go On With Your Bad Self · David Ruffin David Ruffin ℗ 1973 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1973-01-01 Author, Composer: Bobby Miller Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:58:45.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : funkgetier

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Published Date : 2011-12-18T12:42:20.000Z

70s Soul Classic
    

Channel Title : Eddie Kendricks - Topic

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Published Date : 2016-08-24T03:14:37.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Go On With Your Bad Self · Eddie Kendricks The Thin Man: The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 2006 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. ℗ ℗ 2006 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Author, Composer: Bobby Miller Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-14T00:35:06.000Z

Rare song from David's ''Motown Solo Albums'' Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:10:26.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : youngofasho2

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Published Date : 2013-03-22T09:03:25.000Z

The 45 from 1975
    

Channel Title : THE SOULPARANOS

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Published Date : 2013-10-19T10:14:02.000Z

45t - CONSUMER REPORT - Go on with your bad self - 1975 Atlantic
    

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Published Date : 2015-09-26T08:36:02.000Z

David Ruffin's Motown Solo Album. Vol 2
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T00:45:32.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T14:44:17.000Z

[BONUS TRACK] "Crime in the Street" from David's (Motown Solo albums Vol.1) David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:47:40.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T07:06:56.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-06T05:47:05.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1972) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:41:28.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:54:53.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:16:09.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : Funktastic Ed

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Published Date : 2014-08-24T22:05:41.000Z

Available on the LP "Feeling Good" issued in 1969 on Motown Records.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

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Published Date : 2017-01-25T21:45:46.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can) · David Ruffin David Ruffin ℗ 1973 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1973-01-01 Author, Composer: Byron Lee Miller Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Dancechick68

Views : 491

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Published Date : 2009-09-09T21:56:10.000Z

Rock on wit your bad self
    

Channel Title : legendsofvinylTM

Views : 845

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Published Date : 2014-05-16T20:12:09.000Z

Legends of Vinyl, Strictly Vinyl Events & Luis Mario's DJ Entertainment - New York & South Florida's Choice for DJ entertainment proudly present. David Ruffin Blood Donors Needed Give All You Can 1973 For more information about Legends of Vinyl visithttp://www.legendsofvinyl.com/ Contact Info: Call our Florida Office 954-979-4493 This music is posted for entertainment only by the not-for-profit Legends of Vinyl to recognize and preserve the unique art form and talents of disc jockeys. Visitors shall not download music without the permission of the publisher or music rights owner. Visitors shall indemnify and hold the posting parties harmless from any and all claims, liabilities and costs, losses, damages or expenses (including attorney's fees) arising from any third party claim directly relating to the music composition and the underlying master recordings Here are the lyrics from Luis Mario and Riki Orellana, enjoy! Darkness falls upon the city Yeah yeah Smell of violence fill the air, would you believe Somebody will rape another woman Yeah yeah A gun will kill another man Listen to me Situation critical Oh oh for the man Listen people Blood donors needed Bad bad bad oh oh give all you can Gotta give it up Listen people Oh oh Emergency room overflowing Through the night I hear the sound of scream and sorry Shotgun blasts are heard from the ghetto Guess what just took the life of a boy 16 Oh oh people Another would be mother her baby she's killing because a thing that come up on his hand I'm screaming blood donors needed Don't make me cry, oh lord we need it (scream) give all you can this evenin' Borrowed time blowing your mind The blood of your arm Got to tell ya 5:45 in the the morning yea yea The dawn breaks the darkness in the east Halleluyah It's morning sun rising yea yea bring the weary city absolute relief And all you people who slept so safely yes get up start your day let me ask you a question When you read your morning paper tell me tell me people tell me What do your headlines say Blood donors needed, get all you can yeah yeah Can I say it -- blood donors needed (scream) you know you've got to give all you can this evening yeah Got say it again Blood donors needed give all you can give it Give it up right now Yea yeah yeah Got to give all you can yeah yeah
    

Channel Title : Derwin White

Views : 3570

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Published Date : 2010-10-19T03:03:18.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 2944

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Published Date : 2013-05-04T14:12:58.000Z

It's well known that Motown recorded more material than it could release, but its reasons for shelving material remain a mystery to this day. Ever since the CD reissue boom of the late '80s, this unreleased material has begun to trickle out of the vaults, and when it does surface in such forms as the dynamite double-disc set A Cellarful of Motown!, the music is so good it's hard to believe that it never was released at the time. Knowing this, it should not come as a complete surprise that former Temptations lead singer David Ruffin had a full, completed album shelved in 1971, but hearing Hip-O Select's excavation of that album on the 2004 release David: The Unreleased Album, it's still a wonder that this record sat in the vaults for over three decades, with very few of the songs recorded during the sessions appearing on other records and compilations over the years. Far from being unreleasable, David (titled as such because the album was never given a proper title -- it was given a catalog number and track sequencing, with David Ruffin penciled in as its name, but that was used as the title for his 1973 album) finds Ruffin at a solo peak, not just a singer but in terms of material. He cut the 12 songs that comprised the album, along with the seven bonus tracks from the same sessions that fill out this CD reissue, in late 1969 and 1970, after he had a big solo hit with "My Whole World Ended (The Moment You Left Me)," with the intent of releasing the album in 1971. There were a pair of covers of recent hits -- an appropriately heartbroken and seductive "Rainy Night in Georgia" and a rather revelatory "I Want You Back," which added real grit to the Jackson 5's effervescent smash -- but most of this was material written for Ruffin and it played to his strengths. While this music was rooted in Motown's signature sound and performed by the Funk Brothers, it also looked beyond Detroit, adding heavy doses of funk, psychedelia, and smooth soul, filled with galvanizing horns, driving guitars, down-n-dirty clavinets, flourishes of electric sitar, fuzz tones, and wah-wah guitars, all grounded by Ruffin's earthy testifying and tied together by top-notch songwriting. All these elements wound up sounding much hipper than much of the music officially released by Motown in the early 1970, when Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye were just beginning to break free of the studio's formula, and while David and its accompanying bonus tracks are not a masterpiece along the lines of Talking Book or What's Going On (or even Where I'm Coming From, for that matter), it's vibrant, exciting music that still sounds fresh -- arguably fresher than full-length Temptations albums of the late '60s -- which qualifies it as a lost classic of sorts. Why was it lost, consigned to the vaults for nearly three and a half decades? According to the liner notes, nobody really knows. Ruffin wasn't popular among the executives at Motown in the early '70s, and he was also going through a number of well-documented personal problems, so it's possible that Motown simply didn't want to promote him at the time, but it's also true that the label had a number of great records, including Marvin's What's Going On, to release in 1971, and Ruffin had two LPs out in 1970, including a duet album with his brother Jimmy, so the market may have been saturated. We'll likely never know the reason why David was buried, but fortunately it has been unearthed, and it's a reason for hardcore soul and Motown fans to celebrate.
    

Channel Title : extinct327

Views : 8616

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Published Date : 2011-02-10T23:23:14.000Z

From the So Soon We Change album.
    

Channel Title : gregsoul59

Views : 4754

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Published Date : 2010-04-01T09:10:38.000Z

    

Channel Title : Jaron Wheeler

Views : 3022

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Published Date : 2013-09-01T19:10:20.000Z

From MS. G.O.A.T. Mixtape
    

Channel Title : nicole robinson

Views : 510

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Published Date : 2011-01-10T08:04:32.000Z

Video uploaded from my hTC mobile phone
    

Channel Title : Nicolas Reboux

Views : 662

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Published Date : 2013-06-20T01:46:14.000Z

David Ruffin Blood Donors Needed Give All You Can / Lp : Same ( 1973 ) Motown Records
    

Channel Title : Bri Hills

Views : 61

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Published Date : 2013-08-29T20:34:58.000Z

I created this video with the YouTube Slideshow Creator (http://www.youtube.com/upload)
    

Channel Title : Srdjan Manojlovic

Views : 18560

Likes : 89

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Published Date : 2009-09-22T09:25:07.000Z

give all you can!!!
    

Channel Title : kai3654

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Published Date : 2012-08-14T07:12:12.000Z

    

Channel Title : Jason Elias

Views : 4053

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Published Date : 2011-03-20T04:32:28.000Z

From David's 1974 LP "Me and Rock N' Roll." Produced by Norman Whitfield.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6257

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Published Date : 2013-05-06T05:18:45.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1973) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 993

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Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:04:57.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Love Can Be Hazardous To Your Health · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 1975 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Producer: Van McCoy Author, Composer: Jesse Boyce Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : The Soul Man Music Channel

Views : 34

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Published Date : 2017-06-22T17:52:33.000Z

David Ruffin – Feelin’ Good Vinyl LP Release Date: November, 1969 Feelin' Good is the second solo album from former Temptations member David Ruffin. Released only six month after his solo debut My Whole World Ended, this album climbed to #9 on the R/B charts. The album was arranged by David Van De Pitte, Henry Cosby, Paul Riser, Wade Marcus and Willie Shorter. Description provided by Wikipedia under Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY-SA 4.0 Track Listing: A1 Loving You (Is Hurting Me) A2 Put A Little Love In Your Heart A3 I’m So Glad I Fell For You A4 Feeling Alright A5 I Could Never Be President A6 I Pray Everyday You Won’t Regret Loving Me B1 What You Gave Me B2 One More Hurt B3 I Let Love Slip Away B4 I Don’t Know Why I Love You B5 The Forgotten Man B6 The Letter DISCLAIMER: Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism,comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship,and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
    

Channel Title : Erb Ruffin - Topic

Views : 445

Likes : 31

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Published Date : 2018-01-18T20:33:43.000Z

Provided to YouTube by CDBaby It's in My Blood · Erb Ruffin It's in My Blood ℗ 2018 Ruffinrights Released on: 2018-01-15 Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : ChasesBasement

Views : 134

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Published Date : 2017-05-11T06:51:31.000Z

In part 2 of the interview David tells me how the cd is 20yrs old...WTF!!!!..LOL!!! We also played new tracks that may or may not be on the cd that may be coming....LMAO!!!! Find his music on www.bandcamp.com/
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 702

Likes : 4

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Published Date : 2017-01-25T21:35:23.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America City Stars · David Ruffin Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here To Stay ℗ ℗ 1974 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1974-01-01 Producer: Norman Whitfield Author, Composer: Dobie Gray Author, Composer: Chuck Higgins Jr Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : lancersj

Views : 319

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Published Date : 2011-11-07T03:13:44.000Z

Having fun in Rhode Island.
    

Channel Title : soufboiTV

Views : 543

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Published Date : 2012-10-19T00:01:05.000Z

    

Channel Title : TheRAREGROOVEMAN

Views : 909

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Published Date : 2015-12-19T19:30:24.000Z

    

Channel Title : jeosoteo1996

Views : 2590

Likes : 33

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Published Date : 2011-10-03T20:17:38.000Z

A tribute to a great performer. An excellent rendition of a classic and a previously unreleased track. Both recorded in 1970. What a talent in the form of David Ruffin. He truly lives on through the music he left behind. Thank you "Ruff"!!!
    

Channel Title : David Marroquin

Views : 284

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Published Date : 2017-03-30T08:59:01.000Z

https://www.discogs.com/Walter-Reed-Gone-With-Your-Bad-Self/release/1549684 No copyright infringement intended. This video is an mp3 ripped from my record collection. My intention is to share the music I enjoy, not to hurt the artists or labels in any way. If you would like a video removed, instead of reporting my account please just ask and I will take it down

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