David Ruffin Crime In The Street 1973....!

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Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5246

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T14:44:17.000Z

[BONUS TRACK] "Crime in the Street" from David's (Motown Solo albums Vol.1) David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 486

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Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:36:01.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Crime In The Street · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 2006 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Producer: Johnny Bristol Author, Composer: Johnny Bristol Author, Composer: Doris McNeil Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 43384

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:10:26.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 25283

Likes : 190

DisLikes : 10

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:58:45.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 38118

Likes : 404

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:47:40.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 13868

Likes : 116

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:54:53.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : rey bakkas

Views : 621

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Published Date : 2014-08-01T20:47:21.000Z

"DAVID” Album. Bonus Tracks From. ’71 Ruffin's third solo album-sequenced,mastered,given a Motown catalog number-was put back into the tape library,marked with nothing but his name. 「Heaven Help us all」♪ Rom Miller : Vocal David Ruffin. '70 Produced by Rom Miller and Tom baird. Recorded August 1970.
    

Channel Title : soul rey

Views : 459

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Published Date : 2015-07-13T20:19:18.000Z

The Temptations/ Lead: David Ruffin ☆Only A Lonely man Would Know ♪ "Lost and Found" Album from. '62-'68 This song was Marvin gaye version "M.P.G" album ’67 Ivy Jo Hunter
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 10171

Likes : 37

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Published Date : 2014-12-06T13:35:52.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Warner Music Group Love Supply · David Ruffin Gentleman Ruffin ℗ 1979 Warner Bros. Records Inc. for the U.S. and WEA International for the world outside the U.S. Writer: Marilyn McLeod Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4914

Likes : 35

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T07:06:56.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 378

Likes : 7

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Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:04:03.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Show Her In Another Way · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 2006 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Producer: Nickolas Ashford Producer: Valerie Simpson Author, Composer: Nickolas Ashford Author, Composer: Valerie Simpson Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 14040

Likes : 114

DisLikes : 10

Published Date : 2013-05-12T19:30:16.000Z

Rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 3261

Likes : 23

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Published Date : 2013-05-13T00:56:46.000Z

Rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol.2
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 820

Likes : 7

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Published Date : 2017-01-25T21:45:46.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can) · David Ruffin David Ruffin ℗ 1973 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1973-01-01 Author, Composer: Byron Lee Miller Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 1047

Likes : 17

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:37:17.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America I'm Jealous · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 1977 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Author, Composer: Van McCoy Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Antonio Lopez

Views : 528

Likes : 5

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Published Date : 2013-01-08T21:43:34.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4803

Likes : 34

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Published Date : 2013-05-05T06:41:28.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 4102

Likes : 18

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2013-05-05T07:03:17.000Z

David Ruffin's third and self-titled solo offering was in many ways a collaborative effort with Bobby Miller, who produced the David Ruffin (1973) album and supplied eight of its ten tracks. There is a conspicuous dichotomy between the personas that Ruffin portrays throughout the project and the man whose fractious relationship with Motown had practically cost him his association with the label. Things had gotten so bad, they permanently shelved what should have been Ruffin's third LP. Motown simply refused to put it out until cooler heads eventually prevailed some three decades later. He was likewise no longer afforded access to "A-list" material and support musicians either. While his previous outings had sold respectably, they certainly were no match for the likes of Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, or even his former bandmates in the Temptations whose "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" had been a crossover pop chart topper months earlier. "The Rovin' Kind" gets things underway bearing an almost emblematic mid-tempo Motown groove. Ruffin's once crystalline voice now endures the sonic substantiation of chronic drug and alcohol addiction. In a perverse way, the combination of his aging falsetto, coupled with the rough-hewn timbre, actually enhance his role in the ballad "Common Man," as well as the blithe and bouncy "I'm Just a Mortal Man" with the Andantes providing the equally amicable background vocals. The update of "(If Loving You Is Wrong) I Don't Want to Be Right" -- a seductive side that Luther Ingram had considerable success with the previous year -- is personalized as Ruffin confides in the opening that he is "a man in desperation" backing it up with the plea "can't you help the situation"? His short rhythmically spoken intro continues as he owns up to his reputation as a "wild child," begging the question whether Ruffin is actually in or out of character. The Philly-style soul of the Kenny Gamble/Leon Huff written "I Miss You" suits the heart-wrenching adaptation. The six-plus minute gritty social commentary "Blood Donors Needed (Give All You Can)" is a starkly accurate portrayal of inner-city life. Perhaps in the escapism mentality of the times, it failed to make an impact on the singles charts. Yet, the lack of a marketable 45 seems to have had little relevance on R&B record buyers as David Ruffin made it into the Top Five album survey -- although it did not fare nearly as well, peaking at number 168 on the pop side. Those slipping figures are endemic indicators of the increasing lack of interest that Motown would invest in Ruffin's future endeavors.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 9874

Likes : 82

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-03T07:07:58.000Z

Less than six months after the release of his triumphant solo debut My Whole World Ended (1969), Motown issued former Temptations' frontman David Ruffin's dozen-song follow-up Feelin' Good (1969). One factor in such a rapid turnaround was the availability of several leftovers from Ruffin's former project and another was undoubtedly to strike again while the iron was still hot -- as My Whole World Ended had topped the R&B charts for two weeks and spawned a pair of pop crossover hits to boot. Keen-eared listeners can discern the earlier recordings as Ruffin's voice hasn't developed the noticeably grittier quality that is reflected in the opening upbeat soul stirrer "Loving You (Is Hurting Me)." His timeless falsetto has a weariness that simply can't be simulated. Of the two non-Motown covers on this collection, the incendiary update of Dave Mason's "Feelin' Alright" wins hands down over the comparatively uninspired, but charming take of Jackie DeShannon's anthemic "Put a Little Love in Your Heart." None other than Motown founding father Berry Gordy himself is credited with the production on the gospel-flavored ballad "I'm So Glad I Fell for You." The raw emotion in Ruffin's fervent delivery and the spirited support of the Hal Davis Singers were enough to take the tune into the Top 20 R&B charts. Although the specific references may have changed, "I Could Never Be President" is as much a politically charged statement as it is an exuberant love song. It projects a more positive future than the present set of circumstances that most of Ruffin's core audience would have been concurrently experiencing. The exceptionally funky rocker "I Pray Everyday You Won't Regret Loving Me" -- which was co-penned by Gladys Knight and her brother (not to mention a Pip) Merald "Bubba" Knight -- is one of the better remnants from the My Whole World Ended sessions, standing among the album's better deep cuts. The lightness of Ashford & Simpson's "What You Gave to Me" pays an homage to Sagittarius' psychedelic sleeper "My World Fell Down" by essentially stealing the opening lyric "Just like a breath of spring/you came my way" and condensing it to "Like a breath of spring you came...." Ruffin's perfect falsetto helps turn in another excellent leftover, which is also the source for the sublime mid-tempo "I Let Love Slip Away." Before Ruffin was assigned the selection, a backing track was created for fellow Motown artist Marvin Gaye. As Gaye never got around to it, Ruffin was thankfully given a chance to see where he could take it. The austerity of Ruffin's instrument indicates more about his personal state of affairs than perhaps he had intended to reveal. Yet he is able to conjure up the same beguiling temperament that had contributed to masterpieces such as "I Wish It Would Rain" and "My Girl." Hip-O Select's Great David Ruffin: The Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 1 (2005) double-disc anthology includes Feelin' Good and its predecessor My Whole World Ended (1969), as well as David Ruffin (1973), and Me 'N Rock 'N Roll Are Here to Stay (1974) -- all of which have been digitally remastered for optimal fidelity.
    

Channel Title : Soul Sauce

Views : 120

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Published Date : 2014-07-16T21:50:44.000Z

I Do Not Own This Recording, If The Copy Right Owners Want It Removed I Will Do So At Once
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6834

Likes : 45

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Published Date : 2013-05-07T07:53:56.000Z

As he had done on Who I Am (1975), David Ruffin (vocals) teamed up with the multi-talented composer, arranger and producer Van McCoy for the follow-up Everything's Coming Up Love (1976). While certainly not a landmark in terms of Ruffin's artistic progression, the eight cuts definitely sound in sync with the concurrent plethora of danceable records spinning in the discotheques. McCoy again called on the finest instrumental support that the Big Apple had to offer with recording session stalwarts Richard Tee (keyboards), Eric Gale (guitar), Hugh McCracken (guitar), Steve Gadd (drums), and Ralph McDonald (percussion). Plus, Diane Destry (vocals), Brenda Hillard and Albert Bailey -- better known as Faith, Hope & Charity. It is their angelic intonations that listeners are treated to during the opening of "Discover Me." McCoy's string and horn charts are ostensibly influenced by the Philly soul stylings of Leon Huff and Kenny Gamble. "First Round Knock Out" was a tune McCoy had initially written for two-time heavyweight champion, Smokin' Joe Frazier, which Motown put out in the fall of 1975. Ruffin's reading is clearly aimed for the dancefloor as the slinky, pulsating rhythm drives solidly for nearly nine minutes. Faith, Hope & Charity lend their breezy blend to the optimistic and reflective midtempo ballad "Good, Good Times." "On and Off" hearkens to the classic Motown sound with an easier, slightly syncopated beat that isn't as heavy as the typical fare on this project. "Ready Willing and Able" is a return to form for Ruffin as he unleashes his world-weary and soul-stirring wailing. The title song "Everything's Coming Up Love" is a rather blatant homage to Barry White's Love Unlimited Orchestra bearing more than a few similarities to the LUO's "Love's Theme." Although there are no slow, romantic numbers, the closer "Until We Say Goodbye" -- one of two selections to have been penned by someone other than McCoy -- adopts a sweet sentiment behind yet another disco-fied drone. The 45s "On and Off" b/w "No Matter Where" and "Everything's Coming Up Love" b/w "Statue of a Fool" -- were issued as singles. Oddly, the flipsides came from earlier Ruffin LPs. In 2006 Hip-O Select compiled Everything's Coming Up Love (1975), In My Stride (1977), and a dozen-plus "bonus tracks" for the all-inclusive Motown Solo Albums, Vol. 2 (2006). The double-CD might prove difficult to find or pricey as it is a limited edition
    

Channel Title : Sunlight Man

Views : 205

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Published Date : 2015-04-04T12:42:13.000Z

David Ruffin - First Round Knock Out (Motown Records) 1976 www.facebook.com/groups/boogieland
    

Channel Title : J50002007

Views : 17161

Likes : 43

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Published Date : 2011-05-18T05:00:52.000Z

Beat made from sample of David Ruffin's Crime in the streets. Please rate and comment
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 3786

Likes : 26

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Published Date : 2013-05-15T18:17:51.000Z

A rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol.2
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5863

Likes : 47

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-06T05:08:22.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1973) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : KaderFunkyman

Views : 855

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-10-30T17:47:20.000Z

Lp : David Ruffin - Who I Am (1975) Label : Motown http://www.funkyband-radio.com/
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 991

Likes : 17

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2015-09-26T08:36:02.000Z

David Ruffin's Motown Solo Album. Vol 2
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 768

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:03:05.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Until We Said Goodbye · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 1976 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Recording Arranger, Producer: Van McCoy Author, Composer: Charles Harrison J. Kipps Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5894

Likes : 40

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-05-06T05:18:45.000Z

Although his viability as a contemporary soul artist was clearly in question by the time of 1974's Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay, David Ruffin was given another opportunity to prove himself. The former Temptations frontman was teamed with Norman Whitfield -- a producer whose prior accomplishments under the Motown umbrella included a host of indelible classics from the Temptations. Among the most prominent are "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep," "(I Know) I'm Losing You," "You're My Everything," "I Wish It Would Rain," "Cloud Nine," "Runaway Child, Running Wild," "I Can't Get Next to You," "Psychedelic Shack," "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)," "Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)," and "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone." The love-gone-wrong lead track turns into a noir funky excursion replete with horn flairs, a moody and evocative string score, and even synth-produced wind sound effects -- all before Ruffin has sung his first note. Once he kicks in with his begging and soulful yearning, the elements coalesce into an effective and dramatically heart-wrenching "tear-stained letter." The upbeat "Take Me Clear from Here" was scheduled for the A-side of a 45 that would have paired it with the cover of Rare Earth's "I Just Wanna Celebrate." It's a pity that the 7" single was withdrawn, as the laid-back vibe reveals a dimension to Ruffin that was all too rarely heard. Exhibiting a total 180-degree antithesis is the attitude-laden remake of the Undisputed Truth's "Smiling Faces Sometimes," which the vocalist introduces with a spoken prologue before easing into a sincere, almost paternal reading. The context of the times makes his delivery all the more poignant, as it seems that he was maintaining a long and tenuous relationship with many executives and fellow artists at Motown -- a few of whom had fallen out with Ruffin as far back as their days in Detroit. Indeed, it doesn't take much imagination from the listener to hear the wisdom in his voice, which is punctuated by the occasional interjection of his trademark falsetto. This number did make it out as a B-side, coupled with the album's ferocious title track that emphatically proclaims "Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay." It certainly has been a while since Ruffin has sounded as committed as he does when he unleashes the telling line "I've made a lot of mistakes in my time...." If for no other reason, the reunion between Whitfield and Ruffin could be considered a success. And even as the single failed to make an impression on the charts, the hard-hitting groove remains as a testament to their remarkable talents. Perhaps to infuse some additional mojo to the studio performances and in spite of the rear LP jacket text that proclaims "Motown Recording Studios, Hollywood" as the facility where the project was cut, the second half of the original platter is bathed in fake live concert applause and ambient sounds. The blues-based rave-up "Superstar (Remember How You Got Where You Are)" is practically drowned out by the copious faux audience. Interestingly, the crowd simultaneously ducks out during "No Matter What" and the excellent update of Dobie Gray's "City Stars." Concluding the effort is a cover of "I Just Want to Celebrate," ending the platter on a high note, proving David Ruffin could still create effective and meaningful music when provided with suitable material and headstrong support behind the scenes -- despite his well-publicized personal and professional problems. In 2005, Me 'n Rock 'n Roll Are Here to Stay joined Ruffin'sMy Whole World Ended (1969), Feelin' Good (1969), and David Ruffin (1973) on the Great David Ruffin limited-edition double-CD compilation from Hip-O Select.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 6599

Likes : 44

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-08T16:11:38.000Z

In My Stride is the final Van McCoy/David Ruffin collaboration. McCoy surrounded Ruffin's harsh, expressive tenor with strings, horns, New York studio musicians, and Faith, Hope & Charity's slick backing vocals. So much to choose from... "You're My Peace of Mind" is a deceptive groover, accented by an electric harmonica; "Questions" is an unsung gem, Ruffin at his pleading, inquisitive best. On the ballad side, "Just Let Me Hold You For a Night" is a majestic production and one of David's best leads, a gripper from the first note. But there's more: "Hey Woman" and "Rode By the Place (Where We Used to Stay)" are mature, introspective heartache sagas. It's about time Motown did us a favor and compiled all the Ruffin/McCoy sides on one CD package.
    

Channel Title : Nicolas Reboux

Views : 654

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-06-20T01:46:14.000Z

David Ruffin Blood Donors Needed Give All You Can / Lp : Same ( 1973 ) Motown Records
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 2593

Likes : 21

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-13T17:26:40.000Z

Rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : Adrian Fisher

Views : 463

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-10-30T23:12:41.000Z

(Ricky Matthews-Ronald Matlock-Roderick Harrison) publ. Jobete. Recorded Hitsville-GW, completed 20-Apr-70 ; produced by Clay McMurray. Album: David - The Unreleased Album (2004) DISCLAIMER: I do not own the rights to the original song and artwork. This video was made with the main aim to PROMOTE THE MUSIC AND THE ARTIST. Buy the music and support the artists!
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 799

Likes : 10

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:37:24.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America Bring Her Back · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 2006 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Producer: George Gordy Author, Composer: Lawrence Brown Author, Composer: George Gordy Author, Composer: Allen Story Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : whtvsmusic

Views : 7350730

Likes : 51993

DisLikes : 2010

Published Date : 2007-12-21T15:45:38.000Z

Bobby Womack - Across 110th Street
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 3569

Likes : 49

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2017-01-25T21:44:13.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America [If Loving You Is Wrong] I Don't Want To Be Right · David Ruffin David Ruffin ℗ 1973 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 1973-01-01 Author, Composer: Homer Banks Author, Composer: Carl Mitchell Hampton Author, Composer: Raymond M. Jackson Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5261

Likes : 56

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-14T00:35:06.000Z

Rare song from David's ''Motown Solo Albums'' Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 1059

Likes : 20

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:22:18.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America You're My Peace Of Mind · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 1977 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Producer: Charles Harrison J. Kipps Recording Arranger, Producer: Van McCoy Author, Composer: Van McCoy Music Publisher: Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp. Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : Tony Beezwax

Views : 1769

Likes : 15

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-03-24T20:13:28.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 3042

Likes : 22

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-14T10:15:52.000Z

Rare song from David's "Motown Solo Albums" Vol. 2
    

Channel Title : TheRAREGROOVEMAN

Views : 1267

Likes : 22

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-11-07T20:57:13.000Z

    

Channel Title : MANNY MORA

Views : 5930

Likes : 17

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-05-10T01:27:56.000Z

David Ruffin's first LP outside of Motown finds him under the direction of legendary Detroit producer Don Davis, who worked with Ruffin before his Motown days. Davis had been igniting the charts with productions for Johnnie Taylor, the Dramatics, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Jr., and others. Prior to his pop chart successes, he had established himself as one of Detroit's most soulful producers via his Groovesville work for Steve Mancha, J.J. Barnes, and Ortheia Barnes. The thought of him working with David Ruffin blew everybody's mind; no doubt, the product would be the best thing Ruffin ever released -- alas, no. So Soon We Change consists of one of Ruffin's most compelling vocals and seven stiffs. The ace is "Break My Heart," written by David Garner; this is Ruffin at his best, a sensitive plea for his woman to do him wrong, to hurt him deeply, making it easier for him to leave since he doesn't love her anymore -- a little reverse psychology. The other seven tunes are strange; Davis has Ruffin singing in a lower register then listeners were used to hearing, especially on "I Get Excited," where he heads for baritone territory. "Let's Stay Together" is not the Al Green classic, but a nondescript affair that does the title shame. This is the weakest David Ruffin LP ever, which didn't seem possible with Don Davis producing.
    

Channel Title : David Ruffin - Topic

Views : 1664

Likes : 14

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2015-07-04T12:40:14.000Z

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group North America It Takes All Kinds Of People To Make A World · David Ruffin The Motown Solo Albums Vol. 2 ℗ 1975 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc. Released on: 2006-01-01 Producer: Van McCoy Author, Composer: Van McCoy Author, Composer: Joe Cobb Auto-generated by YouTube.
    

Channel Title : pieroangelo2

Views : 455

Likes : 9

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-01-23T17:38:48.000Z

Davis Eli "David" Ruffin (January 18, 1941 – June 1, 1991) was an American soul singer and musician most famous for his work as one of the lead singers of The Temptations (1964–68) during the group's "Classic Five" period as it was later known. He was the lead voice on such famous songs as "My Girl" and "Ain't Too Proud to Beg". Known for his unique raspy and anguished baritone vocals, Ruffin was ranked as one of the 100 Greatest Singers of All Time by Rolling Stone magazine in 2008.[1] He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989 for his work with The Temptations.[2] Fellow Motown recording artist Marvin Gaye once said admiringly of Ruffin that, "I heard [in his voice] a strength my own voice lacked".[
    

Channel Title : 2young2old

Views : 7551

Likes : 57

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2011-08-12T23:24:32.000Z

Recorded in 1966, while still a member of The Temptations Written by Don Davis. Unreleased.

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